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Re: b/m alternation in Thacian, Illyria and Abanian

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  • tgpedersen
    ... French cabillaud, Dutch kabeljauw, German Kabeljau (loan from Dutch?) (large) codfish . The Basque were pioneers in cod fishing, they are said to have
    Message 1 of 50 , Nov 13, 2007
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      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > That's an interesting look at bacalao. I always
      > wondered if you could play baseball with a dried cod
      > --they look like something Barry Bonds would use.
      > There exist metathasized forms with /kab-/ in various
      > languages as well. This is one that stumped Trask.

      French cabillaud, Dutch kabeljauw, German Kabeljau (loan from
      Dutch?) "(large) codfish". The Basque were pioneers in cod fishing,
      they are said to have found the Newfoundland banks. If so, they
      might be pioneers of making 'stokvis' too?

      http://www.groupsrv.com/science/ntopic97179.html
      http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bacalao



      Torsten
    • Tavi
      ... This is a root *munno- swelling , with the suffix -eka, presumably Celtic. This root still survives in Spanish muñón stump , dialectal Basque mun(h)o,
      Message 50 of 50 , Mar 27, 2012
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@...> wrote:

        >
        > There seems to be a fair amount of alternation of b/m
        > in Celtic, which occasionally shows up in Romance
        > languages:
        > e.g. Portuguese boneca vs. Spanish muñeca "doll,
        > wrist", originally "lump"
        > About 10 years ago or so there were some posting
        > regarding this --perhaps on this list, or the old IE
        > list but I don't remember which
        >
        This is a root *munno- 'swelling', with the suffix -eka, presumably Celtic. This root still survives in Spanish muñón 'stump', dialectal Basque mun(h)o, muño 'hill' and Catalan bony 'bump, lump'. But AFAIK this word doesn't exist in Celtic, so it must come from another pre-Latin IE language spoken in the Iberian Peninsula.

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