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Re: root *pVs- for cat

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  • tgpedersen
    ... puss has p- and therefore can t be Germanic either (since that would be from almost non-existent PIE b-). As a matter of fact, initial p- is one of the
    Message 1 of 140 , Jul 1, 2007
      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "alexandru_mg3" <alexandru_mg3@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Rick McCallister <gabaroo6958@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Gaelic piseag can not be from Celtic because it has a
      > > /p-/. It also has a dimunitive ending -ag.
      >
      >
      > -ic~a of Romanian pisic~a is a diminutive too
      >
      > see : mam~a -> m~am-ic~a
      >
      > Macbain's
      > > book is based on a specific dialect, not Gaelic as a
      > > whole or even standard Gaelic. I've seen other forms
      > > of the word such as pus, puis. It IS from English,
      > > given that the normal Gaelic word is cat, which is
      > > from Latin. If you don't believe me, ask Kim Mc Cone
      > > or another specialist in Gaelic and Celtic languagues.
      > >
      >
      > 1. If Gaelic piseag IS from English (with bold :), not with
      > arguments) ... from where is English puss?
      >
      > 2. Why English puss has an Unknown Etymology (Webster)?
      >
      > 3. Where are Germanic counterparts of English puss?
      >

      'puss' has p- and therefore can't be Germanic either (since that would
      be from almost non-existent PIE b-). As a matter of fact, initial p-
      is one of the criteria Kuhn uses to identify NWBlock loans. It so
      happens that I have made a list of Kuhn's NWBlock words in p- and
      supplemented it with Celtic (Irish, Welsh, Breton) cognates, also in
      p- which shouldn't be there, but all three dictionaries I consulted
      were brim-full with words in p- (and the NWBlock cognates all had
      invariably p-, regardless of whether the language was q-Celtic or
      p-Celtic), and it worries me that no Celtic expert has been puzzled
      and/or dismisses them as loans from Enlgish (but they can't be
      English, they have p-!).

      http://www.angelfire.com/rant/tgpedersen/KuhnText/list.html

      One possible solution is to consider whether it is possible the Celts
      in England had replaced a NWBlock-speaking people. Is there some
      heavy-duty Celtic expert out there who will issue something
      authoritative on this subject?


      As for the -eag suffix; it appears in several of the Celtic cognates
      I've found to Kuhn's list; it seems to correspond to the typical
      NWBlock -Vk-suffix


      Torsten
    • Brian M. Scott
      ... Yes. ... To be honest, I ve not paid any attention to them, so I have no opinion. Brian
      Message 140 of 140 , Sep 24, 2011
        At 10:26:26 AM on Monday, September 19, 2011, Torsten wrote:

        >> Perfectly normal in Germanic. Six others:

        >> *libnō- 'be left over',
        >> *libjanaN 'to live';

        >> *fra-luznō- 'become lost',
        >> *fra-leusanaN 'to lose';

        >> *þurznō- 'to dry out (intr.), wither',
        >> *þersanaN 'to dry out' (trans.);

        >> *ga-sturknō- 'to dry up (intr.), thicken',
        >> *ga-sterkanaN 'to cause to harden';

        >> *waknō- 'to wake up (intr.)',
        >> *wakjanaN 'to wake (someone) up; to be awake';

        >> *liznō- 'to learn',
        >> *laizijanaN 'to teach'.

        >> The pair

        >> *warnō- 'to take heed; to warn',
        >> *warjanaN 'to protect'

        >> fits the pattern well.

        > So you're saying there are two suffixes in play here

        > *-nó:- and *´-(j)a-n- ?

        Yes.

        > Thanks for pointing that out.

        > Would you say the correspondences to *war- and *war-Vn-
        > outside Germanic which Tavi pointed out are spurious then?

        To be honest, I've not paid any attention to them, so I have
        no opinion.

        Brian
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