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Network model of IE languages from McMahon and McMahon (2005)

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  • mkelkar2003
    Please see McMahon and McMahon 2005.pdf in the files section. The boxes indicate reticulations or the possibility of multiple parents. The model is very far
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2007
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      Please see McMahon and McMahon 2005.pdf in the files section. The
      boxes indicate reticulations or the possibility of multiple parents.
      The model is very far from a perfect tree. IIr is the cleanest branch
      with no interactions with other branches.

      M. Kelkar

      McMahon, April and McMahon Robert (2005). Language Classification by
      Numbers. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • mkelkar2003
      ... However, as Thomason (ibid. 11) observes, It is not just words that get borrowed: all aspects of language structure are subject to transfer from one
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 28, 2007
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "mkelkar2003" <swatimkelkar@...> wrote:
        >
        > Please see McMahon and McMahon 2005.pdf in the files section. The
        > boxes indicate reticulations or the possibility of multiple parents.
        > The model is very far from a perfect tree. IIr is the cleanest branch
        > with no interactions with other branches.
        >
        > M. Kelkar
        >
        > McMahon, April and McMahon Robert (2005). Language Classification by
        > Numbers. New York: Oxford University Press.
        >

        "However, as Thomason (ibid. 11) observes, "It is not just words that
        get borrowed: all aspects of language structure are subject to
        transfer from one language to another, give the right mix of social
        and linguistic circumstances." (McMahon and McMahon 2005, pp. 77-78)."

        "Returning to Thomason's remaining typological categories, there is
        general agreement that in relatively casual contact situations
        borrowing is likely to be restricted to non-basic vocabulary; but as
        contact becomes more intense there may be borrowing of basic
        vocabulary, and also structural borrowing of phonology, morphology and
        syntax (McMahon and McMahon 2005, p. 78)."

        "In figure 6.9(a), English appears quite clearly as a North Germanic
        language. In Figure 6.9 (b), however, the recoding of that single
        item (wing) as a loan means English appears outside the North Germanic
        branch. Indeed, in Figure 6.9 (b) English falls outside Germanic
        branch altogether, due to the influence of borrowings from Romance.
        These have been entirely appropriately coded as borrowings, or unique
        items, in the database, but cumulative effects of all these unique
        states is to distance English from the other Germanic languages which
        do not share them. It is notable that the coding of even a single
        item can have such a powerful effect on the structure of the graph
        (McMahon and McMahon, p. 154, third parenthesis added)."

        McMahon April, and McMahon Robert (2005). Language classification by
        numbers. New York: Oxford University Press.

        M. Kelkar
      • Richard Wordingham
        ... Which is in itself cause for alarm, as English is not a North Germanic language. ... If you are classifying by similarity, this is an entirely reasonable
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 28, 2007
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          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "mkelkar2003" <swatimkelkar@...> wrote:

          > "In figure 6.9(a), English appears quite clearly as a North Germanic
          > language.

          Which is in itself cause for alarm, as English is not a North Germanic
          language.

          > In Figure 6.9 (b), however, the recoding of that single
          > item (wing) as a loan means English appears outside the North Germanic
          > branch. Indeed, in Figure 6.9 (b) English falls outside Germanic
          > branch altogether, due to the influence of borrowings from Romance.
          > These have been entirely appropriately coded as borrowings, or unique
          > items, in the database, but cumulative effects of all these unique
          > states is to distance English from the other Germanic languages which
          > do not share them.

          If you are classifying by similarity, this is an entirely reasonable
          consequence. It is for this sort of reason that some try to use
          synapomorphies when drawing up genealogical trees.

          Note the parallels between Romany and English.

          Richard.
        • mkelkar2003
          ... Germanic ... Germanic ... Germanic ... Romance. ... unique ... which ... Review of McMahon and McMahon 2005 by John Nerbonne
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 30, 2007
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            --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Wordingham" <richard@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "mkelkar2003" <swatimkelkar@>
            wrote:
            >
            > > "In figure 6.9(a), English appears quite clearly as a North
            Germanic
            > > language.
            >
            > Which is in itself cause for alarm, as English is not a North
            Germanic
            > language.
            >
            > > In Figure 6.9 (b), however, the recoding of that single
            > > item (wing) as a loan means English appears outside the North
            Germanic
            > > branch. Indeed, in Figure 6.9 (b) English falls outside Germanic
            > > branch altogether, due to the influence of borrowings from
            Romance.
            > > These have been entirely appropriately coded as borrowings, or
            unique
            > > items, in the database, but cumulative effects of all these unique
            > > states is to distance English from the other Germanic languages
            which
            > > do not share them.
            >
            > If you are classifying by similarity, this is an entirely reasonable
            > consequence. It is for this sort of reason that some try to use
            > synapomorphies when drawing up genealogical trees.
            >
            > Note the parallels between Romany and English.
            >
            > Richard.

            Review of McMahon and McMahon 2005 by John Nerbonne

            http://www.let.rug.nl/~nerbonne/papers/McMahon-Review-by-Nerbonne-
            final.pdf


            >
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