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Quantitative Methods in Linguistics

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  • mkelkar2003
    http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/~kjohnson/ling795q/ Three dimensional map in Fig 6.8 of the link below. Germanic falls by the wayside.
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 31, 2007
      http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/~kjohnson/ling795q/

      Three dimensional map in Fig 6.8 of the link below. Germanic falls by
      the wayside.

      http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~kjohnson/quantitative/historical/historical.pdf

      M. kelkar
    • Richard Wordingham
      ... http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~kjohnson/quantitative/historical/historical.pdf Figure 6.3 is easier to read for the details. Isn t this tree based on
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1 5:38 AM
        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "mkelkar2003" <swatimkelkar@...> wrote:
        > Three dimensional map in Fig 6.8 of the link below. Germanic falls by
        > the wayside.
        >
        http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~kjohnson/quantitative/historical/historical.pdf

        Figure 6.3 is easier to read for the details.

        Isn't this tree based on comparisons of spellings? I strongly suspect
        Grimm's law has a lot to do with the distinctiveness of Germanic.

        Notice also that NW Germanic (East Germanic is not represented) has
        its deepest difference between English and the rest. This phenetic
        comparison, not phylogenetic.

        Try this thought-experiment. Cypher a language by shifting each vowel
        to the next in alphabetic order, and each consonant to the next in
        alphabetic order. (The spelling comparison is aware of the difference
        consonants and vowels - I wonder how that was handled for Welsh!)
        Now, cladistically, the cyphered language and the original should
        always appear in the same group. But of you added the cyphered
        language, I rather suspect that the cyphered language would appear in
        a branch of its own coordinate with the rest of Indo-European!

        We have no reason to think that Johnson is unaware of this. He does
        caution that the spelling method may be sensitive to orthographic
        conventions.

        I wonder where French written according to the non-Gallicising
        orthographic conventions of Haitian Creole and Pig Latin would show up
        in such analyses.

        Richard.
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