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Re: [SPAM] Re: [tied] Re: Metius Fufetius

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  • P&G
    And fufidia? Possible link to fides, foed-? Excuse my ignorance. Aren t these fuf- words Sabellian, rather than Latin? e.g. Oscan fufans, fufens from sum
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 31, 2007
      And fufidia? Possible link to fides, foed-? Excuse my ignorance.

      Aren't these fuf- words Sabellian, rather than Latin?
      e.g. Oscan fufans, fufens from sum (suppletive, from bhu root)

      Umbrian shows the form combifiatu = confiditio < com- *bhidh-, so the root
      exists in those languages.
      In Oscan both *bH and *dH appear as f, so if we can explain (a) the u vowel
      and (b) the -idia suffix, you coudl argue for a link. Or would you rather
      make the link with the *bhudh root?

      Peter
    • Francesco Brighenti
      Dear Peter, ... Yes, you are seemingly on the right track as far as the etymology of Fufetius is concerned! As I mentioned earlier, Fufetius is often compared
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 31, 2007
        Dear Peter,

        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "P&G" <G.and.P@...> wrote:

        > Aren't these fuf- words Sabellian, rather than Latin?
        > e.g. Oscan fufans, fufens from sum (suppletive, from bhu root)

        Yes, you are seemingly on the right track as far as the etymology of
        Fufetius is concerned! As I mentioned earlier, Fufetius is often
        compared to gentilicia such as the like-sounding Fufidius (whose
        origin remains unknown; some Latinists, I may add now, think it may
        be from faba 'broad bean'); yet, J.D. Noonan, the author of the
        paper at

        http://caliber.ucpress.net/doi/abs/10.1525/ca.2006.25.2.327

        which I have referred to in a earlier post, suggests that some
        political reasons may have prompted Ennius -- the likely source of
        Livy's tale about Mettius Fufetius -- to create a fictitious name,
        Fufetius, as a *play* on the like-sounding name of the gens Fufidia.

        Noonan argues that a name like Fufetius, as also the name Fufetia
        given to a legendary early Vestal, must have sounded Sabellic or
        Oscan to speakers of Latin, and that a play of words with the Oscan
        verbal form *fufed 'he was' must have been understood by people who
        could speak both Latin and Oscan. See what Noonan writes in the
        excerpts from his article I managed to retrieve via google (ANYBODY
        HERE HAS A SUBSCRIPTION TO THE ONLINE EDITION OF _CLASSICAL
        ANTIQUITY_ SO AS TO RETRIEVE THE FULL TEXT OF THIS INTERESTING
        PAPER??):

        "[T]he chief political importance of the tale lies in its predictive
        value concerning leaders from that 'other' ethno-linguistic
        grouping. Mettius Fufetius is proleptic because he is the first
        embodiment of later Oscan-speaking officials' perfidia and fraus. A
        whole people, Livy thinks, identifiable both because of its language
        and from its magistrates' treacherous acts, betrayed Rome again and
        again over the course of 500 years: in the legendary times of the
        kings, again during the Samnite Wars, later when Hannibal ravaged
        Italy, and on into the years of the Social War, although we must use
        sources other than Livy for insight into this last-named era. The
        notion of a treacherous Mettius Fufetius in legendary times prepares
        the way for accusations of fraus against Oscan-speakers and their
        magistrates in second and fifth pentads of Livy's work. [...] [O]ur
        concern here has to be with Livy's picture of Sabellic- or or Oscan-
        speaking enemies of Rome and their leaders' great, repeated moral
        failing: they betrayed their pledges or made their pledges falsely
        in order to deceive their Roman enemies and rivals. [...] The
        likeliest candidate [for an Oscan word known to speakers of Latin,
        and making a pun with 'Fufetius' -- FB], would appear to be *fufed,
        the hypothetical, third person singular of the perfect of the
        verb 'to be' in Oscan (fufans [imperf.] and fufens [perf.], both
        third person plural, are actually attested). Expected *fufed is
        formally and semantically close to Latin fuit (cf. inscriptional
        fuveit), and the 'valedictory' connotation of sum in the perfect
        tense is well known in Latin ('fuimus Troes, fuit Ilium' in Aen.
        2.325). Ennius himself provides an early example involving his own
        birthplace: 'Nos sumus Romani, qui fuimus ante Rudini' = 'we
        originally Oscans [Messapians] from Rudiae now are Romans' (Annales,
        Vahlen 1928: fr. 377 = Skutsch 1985: fr. 525). The use of the nonce
        gentilician name Fufetius in place of the real nomen gentile
        Fufidius might have sounded like a valediction to him, at least to
        ears familiar with both Oscan and Latin."

        In sum: Fufetius = "Bid you farewell, damn Oscans"! :^)


        Best,
        Francesco
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