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Re: Res: [tied] Catalan Bruixa = witch

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  • clayton_rc
    This translation interprets it as wise women in English: http://www.uah.edu/student_life/organizations/SAL/readings/1999/fall/Week3.html Going from wise
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 30, 2006
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      This translation interprets it as "wise women" in English:
      http://www.uah.edu/student_life/organizations/SAL/readings/1999/fall/Week3.html

      Going from "wise woman" to "witch" would not be a huge semantical
      leap, since "wizard" is etymologically connected to "wise". That's his
      guess, I think...

      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel J. Milton" <dmilt1896@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "clayton_rc" <entrelenga@> wrote:
      >
      > > paste". Does anybody have any comments about the happax Manuel Said
      > > Ali quoted?
      > >
      > > Clayton Said Ali,
      > > > >however, had earlier admitted in Investigações Filológicas (1975,
      >
      > >> p. 257), very convincingly, that it stems from the Latin happax
      > > > >plusscìa/pluscìa, that occurs in the discourse of Trimalchio.
      > *******
      > Apparently Satyricon LXIII:
      > "Rogo vos, oportet credatis, sunt mulieres plussciae, sunt Nocturnae,
      > et quod sursum est, deorsum faciunt."
      > Ernout translates this "femmes qui en savent plus que nous, il ya
      > des fees nocturnes".
      > I would like to see a "very convincing" argument that this is the
      > source of ' bruja' etc.
      > Dan
      >
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