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Re: o-grade thoughts

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  • tgpedersen
    ... Alternative proposal for that nominal ablaut, independent of other IE phenomena: Piotr observes that the connecting vowel -i- in composites can be
    Message 1 of 108 , Sep 1, 2006
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      > And I also believe that these verbal stems of the hi-conjugation
      > were nominal in nature. Cf. the words of the "language of bird
      > names".
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/25888
      >
      > Now watch me do tricks with my new nominal prefix:
      >
      > PPIE *pad- -> PIE *ped-
      > PPIE *a-pad- -> *i-pod- -> PIE *pod-
      >
      > Nice, huh? I get this free of charge by positing the prefix.
      > This ablaut relation is particularly hard to crack, since
      > there is normally not any surroundings to the root to "blame"
      > for the ablaut. The attempts I've seen to derive it from
      > different cases have not been convincing.
      >

      Alternative proposal for that nominal ablaut, independent of
      other IE phenomena:

      Piotr observes that the connecting vowel -i- in composites can
      be accounted for as part of a PPIE *-a-a- -> PIE *-i-o- rule.
      As a consequence we would have:
      PPIE *pad- -> PIE *ped- "foot"
      PPIE *X-a pad -> PIE *Xipod- "X-footer"
      from which languages might generalize one way or the other.


      Torsten
    • tgpedersen
      further from the same text: It is now generally accepted that the Proto-Semitic aspectual system is to be reconstructed to resemble that found in Akkadian.
      Message 108 of 108 , Sep 14, 2006
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        further from the same text:
        "
        It is now generally accepted that the Proto-Semitic aspectual system
        is to be reconstructed to resemble that found in Akkadian. This system
        contains two prefixal forms, one *ya-prus 'he separated' (perfective),
        and another, *ya-paras 'he is separating' (imperfective). The third
        prefix conjugation exists only in Akkadian as the perfect form
        i-p-t-aras 'he has separated'. Its Proto-Semitic status has been
        proposed by Voigt (1987) on the basis of further evidence from Berber
        and Bedawye (North Cushitic). Of fundamental importance for the later
        developments in Semitic is the ambivalence of the reconstructed
        'middle-perfect' form *ya-p-t-aras (intransitive *ya-q-t-arVb 'he is
        close' and 'he got close') between the perfect and the mediopassive
        perfective (cf. Bubenik 2003).
        "

        cf
        http://www.dabis.at/Anwender.htm/Alscher/afroasia.htm

        Akkadian, preterite singular
        a-
        ta-
        i-

        PIE, perfect singular
        *-h2-e -> *-a
        *-th2-e -> *-ta
        *-Ø-e -> *-e


        Torsten
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