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Re: [tied] Kusunda (Was: Re: Woof)

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  • Harald Hammarström
    ... It is not ST any more than, say, Burushaski is. And it is not probably extinct. There are at least 2 fully fluent speakers (of which one is basically
    Message 1 of 1 , May 16, 2006
      > Kusunda (in Nepal, probably extinct by now), if ST at all, may represent
      > another early offshoot.

      It is not ST any more than, say, Burushaski is. And it is not probably extinct.
      There are at least 2 fully fluent speakers (of which one is basically
      monolingual but too old to travel and soon dead), plus 2 more near-fluent,
      as of 2005. Though it is of course moribund.

      > If one were to use the "maximum diversity"
      > argument, the oldest primary branches and the most diversified ST
      > languages are found not so much in China itself but "in and near" Assam
      > and the eastern Himalayas, perhaps including parts of Burma and Sichuan.

      Has anyone read Bellwood's new book (First Farmers)? He is eager to
      identify proto-languages with archaeological entities which _often_ does
      not yield a homeland near maximum diversity point. Any comments?

      H
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