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question on German grammar

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  • fortuna11111
    Hi people, I have been living in Germany and a lot of my German has turned quite natural. Still, while writing, I keep having a problem believing that what
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 5, 2005
      Hi people,

      I have been living in Germany and a lot of my German has turned quite
      natural. Still, while writing, I keep having a problem believing that
      what comes to my mind is actually correct German, even if I have the
      feeling I have heard or read the word somewhere in the scientific
      literature.

      What do you think about the word:

      Inkontextstellung

      I know German has the quality of building complex words. I know that
      a noun kann be built out of an adjective/participle and a verb in
      infinitive (some of them really turned into general-use nouns,
      consider the word Bewusstsein). Yet the above mentioned word (does it
      exist? ever a difficult question in this word-generating language)
      mixes up a preposition in the whole thing.

      Is that okay, in terms of standard German grammar? I would gladly
      hear an informed opinion, since normal people (read, non-scientists,
      non-linguists) consider this way of expressing oneself a madness anyway.

      Thanks for your help.

      Evelina
    • squilluncus
      ... Schuss Evelina, I am not a German and have no academic studies of this language behind me. But I am pretty sure that German functions just as my Swedish
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 6, 2005
        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "fortuna11111" <fortuna11111@y...>
        wrote:
        > Hi people,
        >
        > What do you think about the word
        > Inkontextstellung
        >
        Schuss Evelina,

        I am not a German and have no academic studies of this language
        behind me.
        But I am pretty sure that German functions just as my Swedish mother-
        tongue (mother tongue? mothertongue?) in constructing words like
        Inkontextstellung.
        We have in Swedish a phrase "träda i kraft" (literally: "tread into
        vigour") = take effect (law, regulation).
        The noun is "ikraftträdande" as in "efter ikraftträdandet av lagen"
        ("after the treading into vigour of the law").
        You can't find this as an entry in a dictionary like SAOB, but it is
        a fully natural word in the ear of most Swedes (even if a bit
        bureaucratic).

        This is not a lexical thing, it is plain grammar use no different
        from the gerund construction "after the taking effect of the law"
        or "after the law's taking effect" in English.

        Even if I have never seen a word "isammanhangställande" from a
        phrase "ställa i sitt sammanhang" in Swedish I would immediately
        accept it as natural (with some bureaucratic heavyness).

        The only thing is that word compounding looks a bit clumsy in your
        eyes.
        Compounding, hyphenating or writing separately (Sonderschreibung) is
        however a very difficult thing for us when learning English and I
        often doubt if you master it yourselves perfectly.

        Lars
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