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Re: Greek "mysia", German Mysien/Moesien, Cyrillic " Mizija"

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  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... The only thing I can add to this excellently reported story is that the addition of the has produced a folk-etymological connection with Greek
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2005
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      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "pielewe" <wrvermeer@h...> wrote:

      ...
      > The Russian words for "music", "Muses" etc. all have a -z- and I
      > strongly doubt if anybody ever feels a connection with "musor"
      > and "Musorgskij".

      The only thing I can add to this excellently reported story is that
      the addition of the <g> has produced a folk-etymological connection
      with Greek mousourgos 'musician', apt enough for the composer (and
      occasionally circulated by his biographers, I think) but otherwise
      unreal.

      Piotr
    • pielewe
      ... Never known about that, but it s quite obvious and convincing once you ve seen it. Until this morning I d managed to miss the association with music
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2005
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        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Piotr Gasiorowski" <gpiotr@i...>
        wrote:

        > The only thing I can add ... is that
        > the addition of the <g> has produced a folk-etymological connection
        > with Greek mousourgos 'musician', apt enough for the composer (and
        > occasionally circulated by his biographers, I think) but otherwise
        > unreal.


        Never known about that, but it's quite obvious and convincing once
        you've seen it. Until this morning I'd managed to miss the association
        with "music" altogether.


        W.
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