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-ch

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  • Pavel Adámek, IMA
    In Czech, expressive forms of family relations and personal names are derived with the suffix -ch [x] added to first syllable of the word, for example: bratr
    Message 1 of 4 , May 12, 2005
      In Czech, expressive forms of family relations and personal names
      are derived with the suffix -ch [x] added to first syllable of the word,
      for example:
      bratr > brach, kmotr > kmoch,
      Petr > Pech, Matej > Mach ...
       
      I would like to know in which other languages
      such or similar suffix appears.
       
      My guess is that it is augmentative suffix -sko
      with expressive metathesis to -kso
      and RUKI change to [-xo].
       
            P.A. 
       
    • Miguel Carrasquer
      On Thu, 12 May 2005 13:16:44 +0200, Pavel Adámek, IMA ... Not surprisingly, in Polish. ... ======================= Miguel Carrasquer Vidal mcv@wxs.nl
      Message 2 of 4 , May 12, 2005
        On Thu, 12 May 2005 13:16:44 +0200, Pavel Adámek, IMA
        <a.da_mek0@...> wrote:

        >In Czech, expressive forms of family relations and personal names
        >are derived with the suffix -ch [x] added to first syllable of the word,
        >for example:
        >bratr > brach, kmotr > kmoch,
        >Petr > Pech, Matej > Mach ...
        >
        >I would like to know in which other languages
        >such or similar suffix appears.

        Not surprisingly, in Polish.

        >My guess is that it is augmentative suffix -sko
        >with expressive metathesis to -kso
        >and RUKI change to [-xo].


        =======================
        Miguel Carrasquer Vidal
        mcv@...
      • Piotr Gasiorowski
        ... It was the same in Old Polish (with both Slavic and imported names: you would have been called Pach or Paszek, and I, Piech or Pieszek); we still have some
        Message 3 of 4 , May 13, 2005
          Pavel Adámek wrote:

          > In Czech, expressive forms of family relations and personal names
          > are derived with the suffix -ch [x] added to first syllable of the word,
          > for example:
          > bratr > brach, kmotr > kmoch,
          > Petr > Pech, Matej > Mach ...

          It was the same in Old Polish (with both Slavic and imported names: you
          would have been called Pach or Paszek, and I, Piech or Pieszek); we
          still have some hypocoristic names like Lech, Stach (< Stanisl/aw) in
          current use, and <brachu> is quite frequent as a colloquial vocative.
          There are also related East Slavic hypocoristics (cf. -s^a, -s^ka)

          > I would like to know in which other languages
          > such or similar suffix appears.
          >
          > My guess is that it is augmentative suffix -sko
          > with expressive metathesis to -kso
          > and RUKI change to [-xo].

          This looks completely ad hoc to me, though I can't offer a convincing
          alternative off the top of my head.

          Piotr
        • Pavel A. da Mek
          ... another appellative with this suffix seems to be hoch boy
          Message 4 of 4 , May 16, 2005
            >> In Czech, expressive forms of family relations and personal names
            >> are derived with the suffix -ch [x] added to first syllable of the word,
            >> for example:
            >> bratr > brach, kmotr > kmoch,


            another appellative with this suffix seems to be
            hoch "boy" < hol-ec "the hairless (thus unmature) one"
            (fem. hol-ka "girl).

            >> Petr > Pech, Matej > Mach ...
            >
            > It was the same in Old Polish
            > There are also related East Slavic hypocoristics (cf. -s^a, -s^ka)

            It is interesting that such -a forms seem to be sometimes from -ja
            and sometimes from -a only (-s^a < -x-ja, -s^ka < -x-ik-a).
            In Czech, the suffix [-x] before this -a suffix is not palatalised:
            brácha (bratr, brach, brás^ka), Hácha (Havel), Mácha (Mate^j, Mach).

            Unlike the [-x] suffix, which is added to words shortened to open syllable,
            the -ja suffix is added usually to words shortened to closed syllable:
            Petr > Pe-ch but Pét-ja,
            but there are exceptions as Karel > Kája.

            >> My guess is that it is augmentative suffix -sko
            >> with expressive metathesis to -kso
            >> and RUKI change to [-xo].
            >
            > This looks completely ad hoc to me, though I can't offer a convincing
            > alternative off the top of my head.

            I was not aware of any other source of [x] than RUKI,
            but now I found a mention that [x] can be also from PIE. k^H2.

            P.A.
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