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Re: [tied] Re: etymology of Eridanus

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  • Joao
    Could Eridanus be related to Iardanos (a Pre-Greek hydronym sometimes seen as related to Hebraic Jordan) ? Joao SL ... From: Daniel J. Milton To:
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 2004
      Could Eridanus be related to Iardanos (a Pre-Greek hydronym sometimes seen as related to Hebraic Jordan) ?
       
      Joao SL
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, November 05, 2004 12:27 AM
      Subject: [tied] Re: etymology of Eridanus


      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Smith"
      <mytoyneighborhood@s...> wrote:
      >
      >      Does anyone know the etymology of Eridanus?  I'm assuming,
      from
      > what I've been told, that it is a word of Celtic origin.  As it
      > appears in early Greek mythology (Hesiod, for example), the Greeks
      > must have known about this river in southern Gaul pretty early on,
      > and so could this be considered an early Celtic loanword into
      Greek?
      >
      > -Michael
      *************
           So what river do you have in mind?  The Po?
           As I understand it, Eridanus was a mythical river, or if it had
      a real referent, it was long lost.    At some point (pre-Herodotus)
      it was placed in the NW (from a Greek point of view). I can't find
      when it was associated with the Po, but I believe late.
           As to your specific question, I'll let Herodotus answer it:
      Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) book 3, chapter 115,
      section 1
      "But concerning those in Europe that are the farthest away towards
      evening, I cannot speak with assurance; for I do not believe that
      there is a river called by foreigners Eridanus issuing into the
      northern sea, where our amber is said to come from, nor do I have
      any knowledge of Tin Islands, where our tin is brought from. (5.13)"

      Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) book 3, chapter 115,
      section 2
      "The very name Eridanus betrays itself as not a foreign but a Greek
      name, invented by some poet; nor for all my diligence have I been
      able to learn from one who has seen it that there is a sea beyond
      Europe"

      Dan Milton




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