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RE: [tied] Re: Venus [was: Why borrow 'seven'? (was: IE right & 10)]

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  • Andrey Markine
    This, indeed, seems to be so. However, this may be just a tradition. When calendar was created, then-Chinese speakers used sun for day . Now they also use
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 25, 2004
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      This, indeed, seems to be so. However, this may be just a tradition.
      When calendar was created, then-Chinese speakers used "sun" for "day".
      Now they also use "sky" for "day", but calendar terminology is already
      set and they do not feel need of changing it.

      If modern Chinese can use "sky" for "day", why couldn't some people 5-6
      millenia ago do the same? When creating a calendar, whouldn't they use
      "sky" as time unit of measure?

      You claimed: "Most languages (eg: Sumerian /ud/, Chinese /ri/) use "sun"
      to mean "day"".
      Two examples do not count for "most" in my opinion and now one of them
      can prove only that people pick any term for the "day", exisiting at the
      time of creating the calendar but not necessarily "sun".

      BTW, since this is an IE forum, which IE languagues use "sun" for "day"?

      Andrei

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: enlil@... [mailto:enlil@...]
      > Sent: Monday, October 25, 2004 1:51 PM
      > To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: RE: [tied] Re: Venus [was: Why borrow 'seven'? (was: IE right
      & 10)]
      >
      >
      > Andrei:
      > > Chinese uses /tian/ as both "sky" and "day".
      >
      > Yes but only /ri/ 'sun' is used in _calendars_ for marking
      > dates. 'Sky' is not used in calendars.
      >
      >
      > = gLeN
      >
    • enlil@glenhypermedia.com
      ... Yes, but I meant in relation to _calendar_ which ties in to the Etruscan example that marks the date with /tins /, /tiur/ and /avil/. So since I see no
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 28, 2004
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        Andrei:
        > You claimed: "Most languages (eg: Sumerian /ud/, Chinese /ri/) use
        > "sun" to mean "day"".

        Yes, but I meant in relation to _calendar_ which ties in to the Etruscan
        example that marks the date with /tins'/, /tiur/ and /avil/. So since
        I see no example of "sky" being used to mark days in a calendar in any
        language I know of, the translation must be false. Also, it's quite
        conceivable that another culture's sun god is relatable to Jupiter, if
        it were that their version of the Sun was seen as the leader of the
        gods like Jupiter is or most prominent in the pantheon.


        > BTW, since this is an IE forum, which IE languagues use "sun" for
        > "day"?

        Good point. However, even here, which one uses "sky" to mark time in
        a calendar. I don't know of a single one, do you?


        = gLeN
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