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Re: Fw: [tied] Re: IE right & 10

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  • petusek
    ... From: Harald Hammarström To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 8:39 PM Subject: Re: Fw: [tied] Re: IE right & 10 ... 4/8 ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 30, 2004
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Harald Hammarström
      To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 8:39 PM
      Subject: Re: Fw: [tied] Re: IE right & 10
      >> >> 1. Binary (e.g. Jawony, the Gunwinyguan family of Australian
      >> macro-phylum)
      >> >> (i.e. 1, 2, 2+1, 2+2, 2+2+1, ...)
      >> >> 2. Organized in pairs (e.g. Old Japanese: 1/2 fitö/futa, 3/6 mi/mu,
      4/8
      >> >> yö/ya, 5/10 i-tu/töwo; Nama of the Khoi-San m-p.: /gui & /gaw "1" &
      "2",
      >> >> etc.)
      >> >> 3. Ternary (e.g. Yukaghir: 1,2,3,3+1,...,3+3,...)
      >> >>
      >> >>What? Yukaghir ternary?? Do you have a source for this? Kolyma or
      Tundra?
      >>
      >> Kolyma, Waldemar Jochelson, 1905: Essay on the grammar of Yukaghir
      language.
      >> Annals of the N.Y. Academy of Sciences, XVI.5,II,pp.97-152
      >
      >Thanks, I will check it. My E. Maslova "Kolyma Yukaghir" 2003 says nothing
      >of the sort though..
      >
      >> >> 4. Qaternary (e.g. Chumash of Santa Barbara: 1, 2, 3, 4, 4&1, 4&2,
      4&3,
      >> >> 8...)
      >> >> 5. Quinary (e.g. Sumerian, where the ternary system was also used,
      etc.)
      >> >In what sense do you mean the ternary system was also used?
      >> >
      >> >Harald
      >>
      >> Sumerian: See Igor M. Diakonoff, 1983: Some reflections on numerals in
      >> Sumerian towards a history of mathematical speculation. Journal of the
      >> American Oriental Society 103, pp. 83-93; Dombrowski F.A. & B.W.W., 1991:
      >> Numerals and numeral systems in the Hamito-Semitic and other language
      >> groups. In: Semitic Studies in honor of W. Leslau, ed. A.S. Kaye.
      Wiesbaden:
      >> Harrassowitz, pp. 340-81
      >>
      >> I won't give you any examples, but in short, there was one system which
      used
      >> quinary counting (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5+1, 5+2, 5+3 etc., higher numeral
      follow
      >> different patterns) and another one which used ternary counting
      (1,2,3,3+1
      >> and similar), and even ternal count of days (be, be-be, PES, PES-be,
      >> PES-be-be etc...I've just found myself giving examples, ha ha :-))
      >
      >I have those papers, but this ternal system was used for special purposes
      >or counting special items and not, like the 5-10-20-60 system, for
      >counting an open class of objects. These special systems are not so
      interesting
      >I think and occur anywhere. For example I count beers in sixpacks because
      they

      I really DO think they're interesting, but we'll disagree here. Why are you
      asking me questions to which you've already found the answers???

      >are sold that way. Four sixpacks is a "platta" (carton) btw, and some say
      >it's no coincidence that there are 24 hours in a day and 24 beers in a
      >platta ;-).
      >
      >Harald

      Ok, what then was sold in groups of 4 in the ancient Sumer? :-) Reveal that
      great secret to my humble being, please...

      Petusek
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