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Re: [tied] *gwhor-n0- 'furnace'; is an Indo-Iranian form attested?

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  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... You don t have to reinvent the wheel. Any good etymological dictionary will tell you that is related to etc. (and to Gk. ,
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1, 2004
      01-03-2004 05:55, S.Kalyanaraman wrote:

      > Suffixed o-grade form *gwhor-no-. a. fornax, furnace, hornito, from
      > Latin furnus, fornus, forna_x, oven; *gwhr-. a. burn from Old
      > English beornan, byrnan (intransitive) and bærnan (transitive), to
      > burn; ?forge. Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin
      > *faurga, from Latin fabrica, from faber, worker. ?hearth. Middle
      > English herth, from Old English heorth. (Bartleby).
      >
      > bhra_s.t.ra = fried or cooked in a frying-pan (Pa_n.ini 4-2 , 16);
      > bhat.a = furnace, brick kiln; bhat.i = oven, kiln (Santali)
      >
      > gharma (root: ghr.) = heat , warmth (of the sun or of fire)(R.gveda)

      You don't have to reinvent the wheel. Any good etymological dictionary
      will tell you that <gHarmá-> is related to <forna:x> etc. (and to Gk.
      <tHermos>, for example); there's no mystery about it. But it isn't
      related to <hearth>, and I don't believe, pace Watkins, that <burn>
      comes from the same root (while I do believe that <warm> does).
      <bHra:s.t.ta-> doesn't belong here either.

      Piotr
    • S.Kalyanaraman
      ... from Latin furnus, fornus, forna_x, oven; *gwhr-. a. burn from Old ... to burn; ?forge. Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 1, 2004
        --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Piotr Gasiorowski
        <piotr.gasiorowski@i...> wrote:
        > > 01-03-2004 05:55, S.Kalyanaraman wrote:
        >
        > > Suffixed o-grade form *gwhor-no-. a. fornax, furnace, hornito,
        from> > Latin furnus, fornus, forna_x, oven; *gwhr-. a. burn from Old
        > > English beornan, byrnan (intransitive) and bærnan (transitive),
        to> > burn; ?forge. Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar
        Latin> > *faurga, from Latin fabrica, from faber, worker. ?hearth.
        Middle> > English herth, from Old English heorth. (Bartleby).
        > >
        > > bhra_s.t.ra = fried or cooked in a frying-pan (Pa_n.ini 4-2 ,
        16);> > bhat.a = furnace, brick kiln; bhat.i = oven, kiln (Santali)
        > > > > gharma (root: ghr.) = heat , warmth (of the sun or of fire)
        (R.gveda)>

        > You don't have to reinvent the wheel. Any good etymological
        dictionary> will tell you that <gHarmá-> is related to <forna:x>
        etc. (and to Gk.> <tHermos>, for example); there's no mystery about
        it. But it isn't> related to <hearth>, and I don't believe, pace
        Watkins, that <burn>> comes from the same root (while I do believe
        that <warm> does).> <bHra:s.t.ta-> doesn't belong here either.

        Thanks, Piotr. As I had noted, the first part is taken from Bartleby
        dictionary. gharma has another Skt. form ghrn.oti.

        Are any Indo-Iranian or Hittite forms attested? How would
        bhra_s.t.ra be explained?
      • Piotr Gasiorowski
        ... From: S.Kalyanaraman To: Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 10:14 AM Subject: Re: [tied] *gwhor-n0- furnace ;
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 1, 2004
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "S.Kalyanaraman" <kalyan97@...>
          To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 10:14 AM
          Subject: Re: [tied] *gwhor-n0- 'furnace'; is an Indo-Iranian form attested?


          > Are any Indo-Iranian or Hittite forms attested?

          Sanskrit is IIr. (and so is Avestan: <gar&ma-> 'hot). I'm not aware of any
          Anatolian cognates.

          > How would bhra_s.t.ra be explained?

          It's a vriddhied adjective derived from the noun <bHras.t.ra-> 'frying pan',
          an instrumental derivative in *-tra- (< PIE *-tlom/*-trom) of the Skt. root
          {bHRj-} 'fry, roast' (< *bHreg^-).

          Piotr
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