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Re: [tied] Re: Question

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  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... Why yet ? I said lack of _affrication_ (p pf). In particular, p- f-, -pp- -p- and -p -p, but none of them was affricated. ... I mean a retained
    Message 1 of 64 , Nov 1, 2003
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      01-11-03 18:51, tolgs001 wrote:

      > ... yet <Fejfe> (<fajfe>?) instead of <Pfeife>, but nut *<paipe>
      > (unlike the also Plattdeutsch-speaking English :-))...

      Why "yet"? I said lack of _affrication_ (p > pf). In particular, p- >
      f-, -pp- > -p- and -p > -p, but none of them was affricated.

      >>the vowel in <be-> and <ge-> is a shared retention
      >
      > What do you mean by vowel retention here? (Something similar
      > to <Gesundheit> > [xunthait], <geschissen> > [gSIsn]? <besorgt>
      >> [bso&kt]? (the latter are in Bavarian))

      I mean a retained vowel, as in <gehat>. The failure of the vowel to drop
      out is non-Bavarian.

      >>On the other hand, a long list of structural features shared
      >>with Bavarian can be compiled, including such characteristic
      >>things as the graded diminutive pattern (<-l>, <-ele>).
      >
      > <-le> rather in common with Schwäbisch, Alemannisch (i.e.
      > ink. Schwyzer Düütsch: -li) and Frankonian (in this one, the
      > usus is to write it -la and to pronounce it approx. [l&] almost
      > as in Suebian); also in the neighboring Mitteldeutsch of
      > Hessen, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saar. All of them can actually
      > be deemed short forms of <-lein> (that's known in standard
      > German a.k.a. "Hochdeutsch," an... artificial dialect).

      I mean the coexistence of the two degrees of the diminutive. The "-l-"
      diminutive as such is a common feature of all Upper German, but the
      -l/-ele pattern (tish --> tishl --> tishele) is not so widespread.

      Piotr
    • Peter Whale
      I ve checked the Greek and the Vulgate - both have a simple noun, and have no sin is an adequate translation. I have lost my copy of Faustus, alas, and
      Message 64 of 64 , Nov 15, 2011
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        I've checked the Greek and the Vulgate - both have a simple noun, and "have no sin" is an adequate translation.  I have lost my copy of Faustus, alas, and can't check it.

        --
        Peter
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