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  • vanzalas
    What is the contribution of pre Yiddish to European languages? I rather unusual assume that population who speak later Yiddish did not live traces in absorbed
    Message 1 of 64 , Oct 31, 2003
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      What is the contribution of pre Yiddish to European languages? I
      rather unusual assume that population who speak later Yiddish did not
      live traces in absorbed languages. Literature give picture of quick
      creation of Yiddish and after 1200AD the Yiddish language do not
      change substantially or the language change process is rather slow.
      Even if given take fact that Yiddish speaking population moved to
      other language area. It present that the Yiddish is fully established
      language rather resistant to changes. Is it possible that rather
      small group may affect larger population if power structure was
      correct propitious? Is the old Yiddish similar to other languages,
      existing around Caspian Sea.

      There is rather very contradictory information. Some sources suggest
      some braoun or hazel-eyed population influence and creation of
      Germanic branch from those migrated groups. Other Hebrew or even
      Bantu roots.

      There are any traces ethnic or linguistic after abandoned 50
      thousands men Hannibal army who failed to conquer Rome? Did they all
      die? Perhaps part deserted or live distributed in small groups in
      hard to reach or unimportant areas like Albania or Schwartzwald. Why
      the mare Negro, Schwartzwald. Not every forest is called dark even if
      is dark and dense. Some quite opposite are called White even if there
      are the wildest remaining complexes of European forests.
    • Peter Whale
      I ve checked the Greek and the Vulgate - both have a simple noun, and have no sin is an adequate translation. I have lost my copy of Faustus, alas, and
      Message 64 of 64 , Nov 15, 2011
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        I've checked the Greek and the Vulgate - both have a simple noun, and "have no sin" is an adequate translation.  I have lost my copy of Faustus, alas, and can't check it.

        --
        Peter
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