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Re: Vampire

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  • cristi mindrut
    about the following: Romanian folkore makes reference to a couple of fabulous beings having some vampire attributes. There is vârcolac (the closest
    Message 1 of 42 , Sep 6, 2003
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      about the following:

      Romanian folkore makes reference to a couple of fabulous beings
      having some "vampire" attributes. There is "vârcolac" (the closest
      equivalent of `vampire`) -- an undetermined being "eating" the Sun
      or the Moon during eclipses but also a non-dead blood-sucking guy;
      obviously, the etymon is Slavic (Bulgarian "vãrkolak"). There are
      also other kinds of non-dead guys (merely kinds of ghosts) from
      which the most vampire-like word could be "strigoi" (still Slavic).

      >> "Nosferatu" is Bram Stoker's invention, perhaps a garbled
      >> version of a genuine Romanian word (e.g. <nesuferitul> 'the
      >> unbearable'?). Again, our Romanian friends are better qualified
      >> to judge.
      >
      > I don't know. <nesuferitul> might be too... weak
      > for such a terrible character.

      For `the Devil`, Daco-Romanian uses "Necuratul" (or, sometimes,
      "Nefârtatul", literally meaning `the one who's not in brotherhood
      [with humans]`). A derivation from the latter one seems unlikely
      as phonetics come into play; "Nesuferitul" is slightly better from
      this point of view (still /i/ > /a/ would be rather strange), but
      doesn't qualify because it's not used to design evil beings.
      I would pick something not too far from Ned's etymology proposal,
      even if the final /u/ in "Nosferatu" sounds somehow Romanian.
      >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

      "Nesuferitul", same as "Nesuferitu" means "the Unbearabal one/the
      Unsufferable" in romanian, "a suferi" means "to suffer/to be
      tormented"
      "Necuratu" is "Ne-curat" meaning "the Devil himself", "curat"
      meaning "clean". "curat-ul" = "the clean one"and "curatu" are the
      same, "Necuratul" would be the literary form of the popular
      form "Necuratu".

      Devil=Drac

      "Varcolac" : "Varc"+"colac", could be the slavo-
      germanic "Valc/Wulf"(in romanian "lup") + "colac" wich means "coil"
      => "CoiledWolf". "Lup colac" would be "a coiled wolf", the "coil
      position" is used in romanian for wolves and dogs, when they are on
      the ground, sleeping or saving wormth, or when they are watching the
      pray from unseen position, when they are stalking the victim, and
      also for the snakes when they strangle/suffocate pray,

      "colac" could also be un old word for "ghoul", iving the fact that
      gauls were the enemies of dacians, but i don't have proofs yet

      "strigoi", i would relate it with the verb "a striga", in romanian,
      meaning "to shout/to scream",

      other undead beeing is "moroi", i would relate it with the
      word "mort"="dead" and "omorit"="killed", from "a muri"="to die",
      and "a omori"="to kill"
    • Gordon Selway
      At the back of my mind is a proposition that about 30 people a month were turned off (as it was then often expressed) at Tyburn every month, which would be
      Message 42 of 42 , Sep 14, 2003
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        At the back of my mind is a proposition that about 30 people a month
        were turned off (as it was then often expressed) at Tyburn every
        month, which would be about 16,000 people in all over the whole reign
        of Elizabeth of England. That represents the judicial killings
        within the City and Middlesex, which may have represented no more
        than 10% of the population of England (and Wales) and maybe less. If
        it were an entirely representative (as well as accurate) number, it
        suggests that upwards of half a million people were hanged, burned or
        had their heads chopped off in England between 1558 and 1603. And
        that's before Jamie Saxt (who had a thing about witches in East
        Lothian and then everywhere) skedaddled down to London (and
        apparently showed signed of wishing to have people dispatched before
        trial in the course of that journey). Then of course, there was the
        problem after 1571 of 'regnans in excelsis' which rather got in the
        way of Elizabeth's reported desire not to make windows into men's
        souls.

        Gordon
        <gordonselway@...>

        At 9:12 am +0100 13/09/2003, P&G wrote:
        > >What is your evidence for the 32,000? I'm exceedingly skeptical,
        >
        >I saw it on TV - (so it must be true!) I agree, the figure startled me too,
        >especially as Elizabeth was building a reputation for tolerance. But there
        >are some remarkable stories of torture and death of Catholics during her
        >reign.
        >
        >Peter
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