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Re: Comet

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  • Daniel J. Milton
    ... from ... kom, ... ********** It s Latin cometes from Greek (aster) kometes hairy star . Kome hair is one of those Greek words with no apparent
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 5, 2003
      --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "S.Kalyanaraman" <kalyan97@y...>
      wrote:
      > Middle English comete, from Old English comta, from Late Latin,
      from
      > Latin comts, from Greek komts, long-haired (star), comet, from
      kom,
      > hair. (Bartleby etyma).
      >
      > What could be the cognate words for 'hair' in other languages? kom-

      > in Telugu means a horn.
      >
      > Thanks.
      **********
      It's Latin 'cometes' from Greek '(aster) kometes' "hairy star".
      'Kome' "hair" is one of those Greek words with no apparent cognates
      in other languages.
      (Unless the Greeks, during the out-of-India dispersion of the
      Indo-Europeans, brought it along from the Telugu, and forgot it
      meant "horn", not "hair"?)
      Dan
    • Piotr Gasiorowski
      ... The etymology of is unclear, but it would be premature to write it off it as one of those Greek words . Since it means long head hair and
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 6, 2003
        06-09-03 05:23, Daniel J. Milton wrote:

        > It's Latin 'cometes' from Greek '(aster) kometes' "hairy star".
        > 'Kome' "hair" is one of those Greek words with no apparent cognates
        > in other languages.
        > (Unless the Greeks, during the out-of-India dispersion of the
        > Indo-Europeans, brought it along from the Telugu, and forgot it
        > meant "horn", not "hair"?)
        > Dan

        The etymology of <kóme:> is unclear, but it would be premature to write
        it off it as "one of those Greek words". Since it means 'long head hair'
        and nearly always functions as a mass noun, it can be analysed as
        etymologically a collective in *-ah2 of hypothetical *kómos (which would
        account for the accent: o-grade feminine derivatives of verb roots were
        oxytone, so <kóme:> can't belong to that category). One possible cognate
        is Russ. kom (< *komU < *komos) meaning 'lump, clod' and usually
        assigned to the IE root *kem(H)- 'press together, squeeze, confine'.
        *kóm(H)-ah2 might therefore have meant 'bundle (of locks, strands)'.

        Piotr
      • S.Kalyanaraman
        ... wrote: One possible cognate ... confine . *kóm(H)-ah2 might therefore have meant bundle (of locks, strands) . Here are some
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 6, 2003
          --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, Piotr Gasiorowski
          <piotr.gasiorowski@i...> wrote: One possible cognate
          > is Russ. kom (< *komU < *komos) meaning 'lump, clod' and usually
          > assigned to the IE root *kem(H)- 'press together, squeeze,
          confine'. > *kóm(H)-ah2 might therefore have meant 'bundle (of
          locks, strands)'.

          Here are some lexemes from many Indian languages. Dan, if a Telugu
          *kom or khoma (Prakrit) is cognate with Greek, so be it.

          kun.d.a- clump (e.g., darbha-kun.d.a-)(Skt.); go_d.a_ cluster, tuft
          (M.)(CDIAL 3266).

          kon.t.ai tuft, dressing of hair in large coil on the head, one of
          aim.-pa_n--mut.i (Ta.); kon.t.a (Ma.); kon.d.e (Te.); gon.d.e
          (Ka.Tu.)(Ta.lex.) jhut.i a hair-knot (Santali.lex.)

          komu fine cloth of goat's hair (Si.); kho_ma, kho_maga made of flax;
          n. linen or cotton or silk cloth (Pkt.); kho_ma made of flax, n.
          linen cloth or garment (Pali); ks.auma prepared from linseed
          (Sus'r.); made of linen (La_t.y.); linseed (Sus'r.); linen cloth
          (Ka_tyS'r.); ks.aumika made of linen (Skt.); ks.uma_ flax, hemp
          (Skt.)(CDIAL 3755).

          kombu spadics, the tender flower-bud of a palm-tree (Tu.lex.) kopel,
          kopela_ chapel; crown for children (Kon.lex.) kupar, kupari chignon
          (Go.); koppu chignon, coil of hair (Ta.); female's hair tied in a
          tuft (Ka.); chignon (Te.); kudashpar. topknot of hair (Go.);
          koopagai the tuft of hair left on the head (Go.); kopu hair
          (Kond.a); kopa coil of a woman's hair (Kui); kupuli crest of a bird,
          tuft of feathers (Kui); ku_bbu_ coiffure (female)(Kuwi); kubbu
          chignon, woman's hair-bun (Kuwi); khopa_ young people's back hair
          when raised and folded up, chignon (Kur.); xoppa_ chignon (Kur.)
          (DEDR 2110). khop bunch of woman's hair tied unplaited at back of
          head (N.); khopa_ hair-knot (A.Or.H.); kho~pa_ (B.H.M.)(CDIAL 3939).

          ro_mam < ro_ma hair (Ta_yu. Cukava_ri. 4) (Ta.); ulo_mam < lo_man
          hair growing over the body of men or of animals, pur-amayir (Can..
          Aka.)(Ta.) (Ta.lex.) lo_man hair on body of animals or men (RV.);
          lo_ma body hair (Pali.Pkt.)
        • tolgs001
          ... In Hungarian, knot, bob of hair; bun (the y in writing after the t is only to show that the t is a palatal sound, and not an usual [t]) ...
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 7, 2003
            >kon.t.ai tuft, dressing of hair in large coil on the head, one of
            >aim.-pa_n--mut.i (Ta.); kon.t.a (Ma.); kon.d.e (Te.); gon.d.e
            >(Ka.Tu.)(Ta.lex.) jhut.i a hair-knot (Santali.lex.)

            In Hungarian, <konty> "knot, bob of hair; bun" (the "y" in
            writing after the "t" is only to show that the "t" is a
            palatal sound, and not an usual [t])

            >kopa coil of a woman's hair (Kui);

            George

            PS: BTW, is it certain that Lat. coma is a Greek
            loanword (kome)?
          • S.Kalyanaraman
            ... Can t English comet be related to Hungarian kont.y and cognates Latin, Greek and in Indian languages which I had listed earlier?
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 8, 2003
              --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "tolgs001" <george.st@g...> wrote:
              > >kon.t.ai tuft, dressing of hair in large coil on the head, one of
              > >aim.-pa_n--mut.i (Ta.); kon.t.a (Ma.); kon.d.e (Te.); gon.d.e
              > >(Ka.Tu.)(Ta.lex.) jhut.i a hair-knot (Santali.lex.)
              >
              > In Hungarian, <konty> "knot, bob of hair; bun" (the "y" in
              > writing after the "t" is only to show that the "t" is a
              > palatal sound, and not an usual [t])
              >
              > >kopa coil of a woman's hair (Kui);
              >
              > George
              >
              > PS: BTW, is it certain that Lat. coma is a Greek
              > loanword (kome)?

              Can't English 'comet' be related to Hungarian 'kont.y' and cognates
              Latin, Greek and in Indian languages which I had listed earlier?
            • tolgs001
              ... The hair-do called in Hung. is an extremely remote kinship, in contrast with Lat. mane and its adjectivation with a participial form
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 9, 2003
                S.Kalyanaraman wrote:

                >Can't English 'comet' be related to Hungarian 'kont.y'
                >and cognates Latin, Greek and in Indian languages which
                >I had listed earlier?

                The hair-do called in Hung. <konty> is an extremely
                remote kinship, in contrast with Lat. <coma> "mane"
                and its adjectivation with a participial form <comatus,
                comata, comatum>. Both refer to hair, but Hung. konty
                means... arrangement, discipline, something compulsory
                (be it because of fad/fashion), whereas Lat. coma
                means... freedom. :^)

                George
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