Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [tied] Re: Crows and Garlands

Expand Messages
  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... The raven is just about the only corvid with a hooked beak. Rooks and crows have large but only slightly curved beaks -- nothing conspicuous. All of them
    Message 1 of 203 , Aug 19, 2003
      19-08-03 16:03, Daniel J. Milton wrote:

      > --- In cybalist@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Wordingham" > > > >
      > Latin corvus 'crow' ....... I can't find this little group in
      > Torsten's k-r- words! They are related by the curve of a corvid's
      > beak. Latin _corvus_ also means some type of hook.
      > Richard.
      > ********
      > Are you suggesting a derivation of 'corvus' from the *ker root,
      > based on the (not very prominent) hook of a raven's beak? Isn't it
      > more probable (and generally accepted) that the bird name is
      > onomatopoeic, and that the use for grabbing tools is a secondary
      > application in Latin?

      The raven is just about the only corvid with a hooked beak. Rooks and
      crows have large but only slightly curved beaks -- nothing conspicuous.
      All of them go "kraa kraa", however. I met (and heard) a small flight of
      ravens just two ours ago, and I agree with Daniel that the name is more
      likely onomatopoeic.

      Piotr
    • Jim Rader
      ... Ravens used to be rare in the eastern U.S. outside of wilderness areas of the north (Maine, New Hampshire, the Adirondack mountains of upstate New
      Message 203 of 203 , Aug 25, 2003
        > They are certainly rooks. Rooks are colonial and like to claim city
        > parks as their rookeries. Ravens, which are much bigger and to a
        > lesser extent synanthropic, live in small groups and prefer the
        > country. To be sure, most corvids are highly intelligent and
        > adaptable; I've seen ravens lunching on discarded sandwiches on the
        > Santa Monica beach, in perfect harmony with crowds of people. They
        > used to be rare or at least seclusive in Poland a few decades ago, but
        > are now expanding into suburban areas; I see them regularly on the
        > outskirts of Poznan. Not thousands of them, however, but from one to
        > half a dozen at a time. Sparrows are becoming rare in many European
        > cities for reasons that are not entirely clear. Corvids (especially
        > magpies) and cats have been blamed for the decline of the sparrow, but
        > it seems other factors are far more important:
        >
        > Piotr

        Ravens used to be rare in the eastern U.S. outside of wilderness areas
        of the north (Maine, New Hampshire, the Adirondack mountains of
        upstate New York--the only place I've seen them) and some parts of
        the Appalachian Mountains. But they've expanded their range over the
        last 30 years. They first bred in Massachusetts in 1981 and now
        they're quite findable if you know where to look. There are about 15
        breeding pairs in Connecticut, where they were unknown not long ago.
        But aside from diligent birdwatchers, I doubt that many Americans in
        the East have ever seen one.

        Curiously, there are no crows or similar large corvids in the Americas
        south of Nicaragua, though South America should provide excellent
        habitat for scavengers.

        Jim Rader
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.