Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Hamp and his dog

Expand Messages
  • Glen Gordon
    ... Yuck... Actually, it would mean literally livestock-er , no? Wouldn t we more likely expect *pek u-o:n, if this were so? First, how do we validly get from
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 29, 2000
      Piotr:
      > It's really *k'uon- (n. sg. *k'(u)wo:n). I suppose you've heard of >Eric
      >Hamp's analysis of 'dog' as *pk'u-o:n 'livestock herder'.

      Yuck... Actually, it would mean literally "livestock-er", no? Wouldn't we
      more likely expect *pek'u-o:n, if this were so? First, how do we validly get
      from *pek'u-o:n to *pk'u-o:n despite natural resistance of obscured
      zero-grade forms elsewhere, and then how do we validly get from *pk'u-o:n to
      *k'uo:n without making up an instance of *pk- > *k- for convenience sake
      (Afterall, at least we find *dhgh- in *dhghom- substantiated by forms in
      Hittite, Sanskrit and Greek). I haven't really heard a convincing case for
      **pk- yet where the consonant cluster is _actually attested_. Am I wrong?

      Secondly, the matter of whether *o is particularly ancient is up for debate.
      The *e/*o ablaut can only be so old and often linked to accentuation (cf.
      genitive *-es/*-os, coincidentally with varying accent). There is some
      motivation for *o to have been labialized by *w in *k'won- from earlier
      *k'wen-. Food for thought.

      - gLeN

      ________________________________________________________________________
      Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
    • .
      Piotr and Glen, your discussion about the etymology of the word *kuo:n is starting to get interesting... I m listening. Glen wrote: In fact, I have some
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2000
        Piotr and Glen,
        your discussion about the etymology of the word *kuo:n is starting to get interesting... I'm listening.
         
        Glen wrote:
        In fact, I have some trouble accepting
        that a word for a common and anciently cohabitating animal would be replaced
        so completely by a new formation. Are there examples of this process in
        written languages?
        One more example of a familiar animal that recently changed its name: the German word for horse is Pferd, which was borrowed from Latin paraveredus in the 6th century AD.There is written evidence for this. The English word palfrey comes from the same Latin word.
         
        When I look up the etymology of some other domestic animals it seems like many of them are hard to explain - unlike family terms like brother, sister, which can be traced very far back. If anyone on the list can shed some light on the etymology of words like cat, dog, hound, horse I'd be interested to read it.
         
        Hakan Lindgren
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.