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Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost

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  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... From: george knysh To: Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 5:55 PM Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost ...
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "george knysh" <gknysh@...>
      To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 5:55 PM
      Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost



      > *****GK: Understood. BTW I forgot to ask about the RADA component in RADAGAISUS.*****

      I think it's Gmc. *raþ-/*rad- 'light, quick, easy'. The second element is of course *gaiza- 'spear'.

      Piotr
    • alex_lycos
      ... Doesn t Tacitus call spear other way? I think now at the word used by Tacitus: framee
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
        Piotr Gasiorowski wrote:
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "george knysh" <gknysh@...>
        > To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 5:55 PM
        > Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost
        >
        >
        >
        >> *****GK: Understood. BTW I forgot to ask about the RADA component in
        >> RADAGAISUS.*****
        >
        > I think it's Gmc. *raþ-/*rad- 'light, quick, easy'. The second
        > element is of course *gaiza- 'spear'
        >
        > Piotr

        Doesn't Tacitus call "spear" other way? I think now at the word used by
        Tacitus: framee
      • Piotr Gasiorowski
        ... From: alex_lycos To: Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 8:59 PM Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost ...
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "alex_lycos" <altamix@...>
          To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 8:59 PM
          Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost


          > Doesn't Tacitus call "spear" other way? I think now at the word used by
          > Tacitus: framee

          <framea>, to be precise. However, the generic word for 'spear' was *gaiza- (OE ga:r, ON geirr), related to Celtic *gaiso- (hence Lat. gaesum and Gk. gaison, both borrowed from Gaulish). It was a popular onomastic element. There are numerous Germanic names with *-gaiza- (= Eng. -gar) as the second component, and quite a few beginning with it.

          Piotr
        • alex_lycos
          ... I will put here Ardeal in Romania. I allways asked myaslef which a connection should be between celto-iberic duba and thracian daba/dava , as well as
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
            Abdullah Konushevci wrote:
            > Radogosh is also an place name in Albania and it seems closely
            > connected to metathetic form Ardagast. So, for my opinion, it could
            > also segmented as ard- (Celt. hill) + -ag (*ag 'road') and well-
            > known suffix -ast. The Celtic root is well attested in many place
            > names: Arduba in Illyria (cf. Korduba in Spain), Ardenica in Albania
            > with microtoponym The Hills of Ardenica, etc. The second element is
            > PIE root *ag- "to lead" in o grade *og- derived in Albanian
            > udhë 'road' (cf. përudhë 'to show the way to') attested in place
            > name Hogosht, characteristic aspiration of first wovel in Albanian,
            > besides Serbian form Ogosht. That one leader could gets name from a
            > place name, when he had won a battle, it's well-known fact etc
            >
            > Regards,
            > Konushevci
            > ************


            I will put here Ardeal in Romania. I allways asked myaslef which a
            connection should be between celto-iberic "duba" and thracian
            "daba/dava", as well as the iberic-italic "bria" and thracian "bria".
          • João Simões Lopes Filho
            OHG Ge:rberaht (Gerbert), Ge:rbald (Italian Garibaldi), Ge:rwalt (Gerald) OE Ga:rwin, Ga:rwig (Garry, Gary), Ga:rweald (Gerald), ON Geirrödr Joao SL ... From:
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
              OHG Ge:rberaht (Gerbert), Ge:rbald (Italian Garibaldi), Ge:rwalt (Gerald) OE
              Ga:rwin, Ga:rwig (Garry, Gary), Ga:rweald (Gerald), ON Geirrödr

              Joao SL
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Piotr Gasiorowski <piotr.gasiorowski@...>
              To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 4:31 PM
              Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost


              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "alex_lycos" <altamix@...>
              > To: <cybalist@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 8:59 PM
              > Subject: Re: [tied] Re: Ardagast/Radogost
              >
              >
              > > Doesn't Tacitus call "spear" other way? I think now at the word used by
              > > Tacitus: framee
              >
              > <framea>, to be precise. However, the generic word for 'spear' was *gaiza-
              (OE ga:r, ON geirr), related to Celtic *gaiso- (hence Lat. gaesum and Gk.
              gaison, both borrowed from Gaulish). It was a popular onomastic element.
              There are numerous Germanic names with *-gaiza- (= Eng. -gar) as the second
              component, and quite a few beginning with it.
              >
              > Piotr
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • Brian M. Scott
              At 7:11:05 PM on Tuesday, April 1, 2003, João Simões Lopes ... ... Modern English is from the Continental Gmc. name; OE is
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 1, 2003
                At 7:11:05 PM on Tuesday, April 1, 2003, João Simões Lopes
                Filho wrote:

                > OHG Ge:rberaht (Gerbert), Ge:rbald (Italian Garibaldi),
                > Ge:rwalt (Gerald) OE Ga:rwin,

                <Ga:rwine>

                > Ga:rwig (Garry, Gary), Ga:rweald (Gerald), ON Geirrödr

                Modern English <Gerald> is from the Continental Gmc. name;
                OE <Ga:rweald> is very poorly attested. I've found no
                instance of OE <Ga:rwi:g>; <Gar(r)y> is probably a
                transferred surname derived from one of the Cont. Gmc. names
                in <Ge:r->, most likely <Gerald> or <Gerard>, which tended
                to be confused in medieval England. (Both were also
                simplified to <Garrat> and the like.)

                Brian
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