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Re: [tied] calendar

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  • P&G
    ... The Latin word is best spelled Kalendar . Because of its religious significance, it retained the old spelling of k before a ( q before o and u, c
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 25, 2002
      > Is "calare" a late Latin word?
      > Calendae / Calendar = from gerundial form of Latin "calare", cognates =
      > greek "kalein"

      The Latin word is best spelled "Kalendar". Because of its religious
      significance, it retained the old spelling of "k" before "a" ("q" before o
      and u, "c" elsewhere). It seems most probable that it is cognate with (not
      borrowed from) the Greek kalein.

      The verb calo (best spelled kalo), and derivatives, is attested extremely
      early, e.g. CIL I:I about 500-450 BC.

      Peter
    • alexmoeller@t-online.de
      ... In some dictionaries the verb caleo is given as beeing a loan from Etruscan. But the cognate forms of at least 3 IE languages speak for a properly
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 25, 2002
        P&G wrote:
        >> Is "calare" a late Latin word?
        >> Calendae / Calendar = from gerundial form of Latin "calare",
        >> cognates = greek "kalein"
        >
        > The Latin word is best spelled "Kalendar". Because of its religious
        > significance, it retained the old spelling of "k" before "a" ("q"
        > before o and u, "c" elsewhere). It seems most probable that it is
        > cognate with (not borrowed from) the Greek kalein.
        >
        > The verb calo (best spelled kalo), and derivatives, is attested
        > extremely early, e.g. CIL I:I about 500-450 BC.
        >
        > Peter
        >

        In some dictionaries the verb "caleo" is given as beeing a loan from
        Etruscan. But the cognate forms of at least 3 IE languages speak for a
        properly evolution in Latin.
        Greek = kalein
        PGmc= kallojanon
        Rom = caloian
        From PGmc *kalojanon it is said we have the english word " to call"
        today.

        In Rom. Lang. We have "caloian"= a tradition in the times of dryness,
        aridity, when people make a puppet of earth , decorate it with flowers,
        let it on a river or bury it in the earth with the belief, this will
        bring rain again.
        The term "caloian" is to find in the times of second Bulgarian-Wallach
        empire, Ionitsã Caloian descent of Asãnesti-Family ( see getic tribe of
        Asemnesti).

        If one will try to derive the Romanian form from Latin, it should be
        pretty easy since it seems that "Caleo Janus" can be a composition of
        "calling Jupiter", so there you got it "calo+ianu"= from latin "Calo
        Janus". If this is a pertinent composition, I am not able to say:-)
        But, enough with speculations. Cf. DEX, the Romanian word "caloian" is
        not a loanword, but is to see in parallel with the Slavic word "kalenU".
        I have no idea what Slavic "kalenU" means, but I don't see why a nasal
        from Slavic will disappear in Romanian . So far I don't know why there
        is just with Slavic "kalenU" a correspondence since we have "calo" in
        Latin, "*kallojanon" in PGmc, "kalein" in Greek and of course, if
        belonging to the same family , the Slavic "kalenU".


        Regards
        Alex.
      • P&G
        ... caleo is a totally different word form calo/kalo. The root caleo shows the typical three-fold pattern of Latin stative verbs: caleo = to be warm calidus
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 26, 2002
          > In some dictionaries the verb "caleo" is given as beeing a loan from
          > Etruscan. ...> Greek = kalein

          caleo is a totally different word form calo/kalo. The root caleo shows the
          typical three-fold pattern of Latin stative verbs:
          caleo = to be warm
          calidus = warm
          calor = warmth
          (for this pattern cf rigeo, rigidus, rigor; timeo, timidus, timor, and
          many others).
          The etymology of this word is indeed unclear.

          Latin calo/kalo on the other hand is undoubtedly inherited form PIE, and
          connected to Greek kalein and the others. Note that the Greek form is a
          contract verb kale-ein. Note that the Latin form is first conjugation
          kala-o. Note the forms in kle: and kla: or kl: (eg Latin cla:-mo, Homeric
          kle:tor). These are clues that the root is not really kal- but kelH-. In
          fact Greek kaleo < *klH-eyo (H1; the l is syllablic, hence > -al-).

          Peter
        • regular reg
          As far as I know kalenU means nothing in Slavic. KOLENO means - a knee. However, and as I said before try KOLEDO (one of Slavic customs), KOLEDARI (people who
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 27, 2002

            As far as I know kalenU means nothing in Slavic. KOLENO means - a knee. However, and as I said before try KOLEDO (one of Slavic customs), KOLEDARI (people who celebrate KOLEDO/A).



             

            >From: alexmoeller@...
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            >
            >P&G wrote:
            > >> Is "calare" a late Latin word?
            > >> Calendae / Calendar = from gerundial form of Latin "calare",
            > >> cognates = greek "kalein"
            > >
            > > The Latin word is best spelled "Kalendar". Because of its religious
            > > significance, it retained the old spelling of "k" before "a" ("q"
            > > before o and u, "c" elsewhere). It seems most probable that it is
            > > cognate with (not borrowed from) the Greek kalein.
            > >
            > > The verb calo (best spelled kalo), and derivatives, is attested
            > > extremely early, e.g. CIL I:I about 500-450 BC.
            > >
            > > Peter
            > >
            >
            >In some dictionaries the verb "caleo" is given as beeing a loan from
            >Etruscan. But the cognate forms of at least 3 IE languages speak for a
            >properly evolution in Latin.
            >Greek = kalein
            >PGmc= kallojanon
            >Rom = caloian
            >From PGmc *kalojanon it is said we have the english word " to call"
            >today.
            >
            >In Rom. Lang. We have "caloian"= a tradition in the times of dryness,
            >aridity, when people make a puppet of earth , decorate it with flowers,
            >let it on a river or bury it in the earth with the belief, this will
            >bring rain again.
            >The term "caloian" is to find in the times of second Bulgarian-Wallach
            >empire, Ionits� Caloian descent of As�nesti-Family ( see getic tribe of
            >Asemnesti).
            >
            >If one will try to derive the Romanian form from Latin, it should be
            >pretty easy since it seems that "Caleo Janus" can be a composition of
            >"calling Jupiter", so there you got it "calo+ianu"= from latin "Calo
            >Janus". If this is a pertinent composition, I am not able to say:-)
            >But, enough with speculations. Cf. DEX, the Romanian word "caloian" is
            >not a loanword, but is to see in parallel with the Slavic word "kalenU".
            >I have no idea what Slavic "kalenU" means, but I don't see why a nasal
            >from Slavic will disappear in Romanian . So far I don't know why there
            >is just with Slavic "kalenU" a correspondence since we have "calo" in
            >Latin, "*kallojanon" in PGmc, "kalein" in Greek and of course, if
            >belonging to the same family , the Slavic "kalenU".
            >
            >
            >Regards
            >Alex.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


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