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Initial 's' in Brittonic

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  • guto rhys
    Can anyone explain why Brittonic retained initial s in some words while mutating it to h- in others. I am aware that this change is dated to the Roman
    Message 1 of 35 , Aug 1, 2002
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      Can anyone explain why Brittonic retained initial 's' in some words while mutating it to 'h-' in others. I am aware that this change is dated to the Roman occupation in Britain as words borrowed from Latin retain the 's' (`'saeth' - arrow, 'sych' - dry etc.). It seems not to be related to the nature of the following vowel as we have 'saith' - seven < *se- and 'hy' strong/proud/rude < seg-. Do similar situations exist in other IE languages?



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    • richardwordingham
      ... the ... is ther= ... where ... By http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/14530 the Latin change *ð *v (v = fricative that became b) was not
      Message 35 of 35 , Aug 28, 2002
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        --- In cybalist@y..., "richardwordingham" <richard.wordingham@m...>
        wrote:
        > Languages also undergo sporadic sound changes. For example, the
        > change of intervocalic dH to Latin b referred to above, in detail
        the
        > process dH > *θ > *ð > *v > b (or dH > *θ > *f > *v > b -
        is ther=
        > e
        > any evidence to tell between them?), where *v is NOT the sound
        > written <v> in Latin, did not always occur. There are instance
        where
        > the change went dH > *θ > *ð > d, i.e. the change from dental
        > fricative to labial fricative was not universal intervocally.

        By http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cybalist/message/14530 the Latin
        change *ð > *v (v = fricative that became b) was not sporadic but
        conditioned.

        Richard.
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