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Re: [tied] Centum in Vedic?

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  • Piotr Gasiorowski
    ... From: Dean_Anderson To: cybalist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, February 25, 2002 9:46 PM Subject: [tied] Centum in Vedic? ... The source of is IE *s
    Message 1 of 31 , Feb 25, 2002
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      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, February 25, 2002 9:46 PM
      Subject: [tied] Centum in Vedic?

      > My main question is whether it is possibly left over from a Centum form of Vedic since the change from 'k'>'S' is supposed to be more likely than the opposite?
       
      The source of <s.> is IE *s in the "ruki" context, not a velar stop, so it's quite clear that <kH> is secondary. Quite likely, the spelling was employed to represent a velar fricative pronunciation [x] in the dialects. The development of "ruki" *s^ to *x is attested in Slavic. A similar development has taken place in Spanish (the old pronunciation of <j/x> was [s^]).
       
      Piotr
    • tgpedersen
      ... attested ... old ... On Swedish sh x : I might be wrong, but it seems to me native Swedes don t get past a pronunciation I can best compare to the
      Message 31 of 31 , Mar 4, 2002
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        --- In cybalist@y..., "Dean_Anderson" <dean_anderson@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > The source of <s.> is IE *s in the "ruki" context, not a velar
        > stop, so it's quite clear that <kH> is secondary. Quite likely, the
        > spelling was employed to represent a velar fricative pronunciation
        > [x] in the dialects. The development of "ruki" *s^ to *x is
        attested
        > in Slavic. A similar development has taken place in Spanish (the
        old
        > pronunciation of <j/x> was [s^]).
        >
        > So then what we're seeing is probably s. > x > kh? In other words,
        > it's an uncommon but not unheard of "un-satemization"?

        On Swedish sh > x : I might be wrong, but it seems to me native
        Swedes don't get past a pronunciation I can best compare to the
        American version of wh-. You hear the -x- pronunciation from
        immigrants, however, probably because they identify Swedish sh- with
        the -x- of their native language (any Swedes here want to comment on
        this?). This may then also have happened in the other cases, or?

        Torsten
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