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[tied] Re: Burial customs in the countries around Denmark

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  • Joseph S Crary
    I remember reading an account that mentions a trip taken by a Briton or Cymbr Christian priest in England to the territory occupied by Danes. I believe it was
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 30, 2001
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      I remember reading an account that mentions a trip taken by a Briton
      or Cymbr Christian priest in England to the territory occupied by
      Danes. I believe it was in Northumberia near York. The story tells of
      the priest comming on a bizarre and gastly sight while passing a
      swamp and seeing men, horses, cattle, and wild animals of different
      types, all in various stages of decomposition. All had been hung as
      offerings by their necks, from the great limbs of a huge and ancient
      tree.

      Could some of these bog people have been hung tree offering that had
      quickly fell with their noose, and slipped beneath the cold waters?


      Joseph S Crary
    • tgpedersen@hotmail.com
      ... Briton ... of ... ancient ... had ... Anything is possible, but how many big trees overhanging a bog do you see? BTW There is a novel interpretation in the
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 1, 2001
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        --- In cybalist@y..., "Joseph S Crary" <pva@d...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I remember reading an account that mentions a trip taken by a
        Briton
        > or Cymbr Christian priest in England to the territory occupied by
        > Danes. I believe it was in Northumberia near York. The story tells
        of
        > the priest comming on a bizarre and gastly sight while passing a
        > swamp and seeing men, horses, cattle, and wild animals of different
        > types, all in various stages of decomposition. All had been hung as
        > offerings by their necks, from the great limbs of a huge and
        ancient
        > tree.
        >
        > Could some of these bog people have been hung tree offering that
        had
        > quickly fell with their noose, and slipped beneath the cold waters?
        >
        >
        > Joseph S Crary

        Anything is possible, but how many big trees overhanging a bog do you
        see?
        BTW There is a novel interpretation in the papers here today of the
        numerous gold finds (bracteats especially) here from Germanic Iron
        Age: They were sacrifices to appease the gods during the summer that
        disappeared 535 CE, when according to Syrian and Chines chroniclers
        the sun turned blue in summer, and didn't cast shadows. And these
        sacrifices included animals and humans.

        Torsten
      • tgpedersen@hotmail.com
        ... about his ... the life ... eternity ... etc. why ... ready to ... for this ... embalming ... bog? ... But would people know that bog bodies were preserved
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 1, 2001
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          --- In cybalist@y..., "Alexander Stolbov" <astolbov@m...> wrote:
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: <tgpedersen@h...>
          > To: <cybalist@y...>
          > Sent: Thursday, November 29, 2001 2:56 PM
          > Subject: [tied] Re: Burial customs in the countries around Denmark
          >
          > ...
          > > And I don't think that people who are found in the bogs have
          > > been "buried" in the ordinary sense of the word. The alternative
          > > theory, of course, is that they were criminals, but consider the
          > > unpleasant scenario of an invasion, counter-invasion against the
          > > Heruli etc. Who ends up in the bog then? Hm!
          > ...
          >
          > [A]
          > I can add one more speculation:
          >
          > I've read that this person had hands (fingers) which witnessed
          about his
          > high social position. He could be a priest, for example.
          >
          > The mummification is a way to keep the body maximally integral for
          the life
          > after death.
          > If some Danish bogs are so remarkable, that they keep bodies for
          eternity
          > without such complex operations as removing brain from the skull
          etc. why
          > not to use this for burying the most worthy people when they are
          ready to
          > meet gods? Suffocation seems to be the best way of mortification
          for this
          > purpose.
          > It would be very interesting to check whether minimal additional
          embalming
          > was used.
          >
          > The questions:
          > Were numerous dead bodies of different animals found in the same
          bog?
          > Were they preserved as perfect as the Tollund man?
          > Were any objects found together with that man?
          >
          > Alexander

          But would people know that bog bodies were preserved then (of course,
          there is also the theory that later mythological monsters, "bogeymen"
          had to do with finds in the bogs (and the bogs, at the time of the
          sacrifice, were lakes, and lakes were holes in the world leading to
          the other side (German loch = "hole")))? There was an exhibition of
          bog bodies from all over north west Europe (several hundreds have
          been registered if not preserved) at Silkeborg Museum some years
          back. I saw it. There seemed to have been nothing much found with the
          corpses, no furnishings, no animals even. Everything I saw points to
          a dirty business, throats slit from ear to ear; although some had had
          their eyes carefully closed after death.

          Torsten
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