Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

slapping bugs

Expand Messages
  • cloud runner
    HI HI !!! (which, as you know, is actually, HO HO in American landline Morse. Yes, there are reasons for setting the gaps wide and slapping the bug. In
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 28 10:25 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      HI HI !!!  (which, as you know, is actually, "HO HO" in American landline Morse.
       
      Yes, there are reasons for setting the gaps wide and slapping the bug.  In days gone by, if you set the bug closely and manipulated the lever gentley with your fingers, you would be ridiculed at best, fired at worst.  Why?
       
      First off, proper and dignified dits require that the vibrating spring be set in motion with some momentum which is achieved by accelerating the lever across a space, and hitting the stop post deflecting the spring.
       
      This becomes more poignant with landline Morse and early radios in which the key was switching large currents and voltages.  Little bitty vibrations barely making dits as you may get away with now with low current and low voltage solid state switching simply wouldn't do.  You would wind up with one long fuzzy arc instead of distinct dits.
       
      Proper bug Morse requires the motion be imparted from the wrist and elbow, not the fingers.  Fingers squeeze an iambic paddle nicely, even dashes come from tendons, not muscles.
       
      Have fun with morse,
       
      Fred - kt5x
       
      modest bug collection can be seen at www.kt5x.com
       
       
       
       
       
    • hermit
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 28 2:18 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        On Mon, 28 Jul 2008 11:25:05 -0600, you wrote:

        >HI HI !!! (which, as you know, is actually, "HO HO" in American landline Morse.
        >
        >Yes, there are reasons for setting the gaps wide and slapping the bug. In days gone by, if you set the bug closely and manipulated the lever gentley with your fingers, you would be ridiculed at best, fired at worst. Why?
        >
        >First off, proper and dignified dits require that the vibrating spring be set in motion with some momentum which is achieved by accelerating the lever across a space, and hitting the stop post deflecting the spring.
        >
        >This becomes more poignant with landline Morse and early radios in which the key was switching large currents and voltages. Little bitty vibrations barely making dits as you may get away with now with low current and low voltage solid state switching simply wouldn't do. You would wind up with one long fuzzy arc instead of distinct dits.
        >
        >Proper bug Morse requires the motion be imparted from the wrist and elbow, not the fingers. Fingers squeeze an iambic paddle nicely, even dashes come from tendons, not muscles.
        >
        >Have fun with morse,
        >
        >Fred - kt5x
        >
        >modest bug collection can be seen at www.kt5x.com
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.