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Titanic CQD message and Marconi recording devices

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  • David Ring
    From: Parks Stephenson I think that I found a historical tidbit that may drive the final nail into the coffin about the authenticity of the Titanic CQD
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 14, 2008
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      From: Parks Stephenson

      I think that I found a historical tidbit that may drive the final
      nail into the coffin about the authenticity of the "Titanic CQD"
      recording that has been a topic of discussion in this group for the
      past couple of months.

      As some of you know, there was an wireless pioneer by the name of
      Charles Apgar who is acknowledged as the first to make recordings of
      wireless transmissions, using a modification to his Edison
      dictaphone. The original wax cylinders on which he made these
      recordings have been lost to time, but on 27 December 1934, Apgar
      presented a sample (only 2, unfortunately) of his recordings to NBC
      host George Hicks on radio station WJZ in New York. That broadcast,
      copies of which are kept in the archives of both the AWA and the
      Library of Congress, does not contain the Titanic CQD message, but
      Apgar's voice in the WJZ recording sounds a lot like the unknown
      presenter who says, "1912," at the beginning of the Titanic
      recording. For that reason, we can surmise that the Titanic
      recording was demonstrated during a similar radio broadcast at around
      the same time (give or take a few years).

      Here's the real kicker, though...according to Apgar's biographers,
      Apgar invented his wireless recorder in 1913, while working as a
      researcher for Roy Wigan, the chief engineer in the New Jersey office
      of the American Marconi Company. There was no known wireless
      recorder (of sound) in existence, much less in use by the Marconi
      Company, prior to 1913. If this information is correct, then there
      was no recorder available to record Titanic's signals in 1912.

      The recording itself begins right as the presenter says, "1912." If
      you listen carefully, you can tell that the beginning of "1912" is
      clipped; evidently, the speaker was saying something before "1912,"
      but that part of the recording was omitted. I would like to know
      what was being said at that point (could it have been something like,
      "...as it would have sounded like in 1912"?). I believe that therein
      lies the correct description for this recording and it is not what
      people who want to pass this off as a genuine Titanic artefact would
      like to have us know.

      73,
      Parks


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