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Re: [Radio Officers, &c] Re: [CW] Re: SOS de MGY - Titanic - Real? or Fake?

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  • David Ring
    Hello Peter, Thanks for your comments (see below my SIG). I ve heard people send with a straight key at this speed. And it sound more like a straight key at
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 23, 2007
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      Hello Peter,

      Thanks for your comments (see below my SIG).

      I've heard people send with a straight key at this speed. And it sound
      more like a straight key at that speed than it does a bug. However to
      support your comments, I only found one dash that wasn't timed
      correctly - it was shorter than the others. I didn't hear any
      variation in the dots, but neither did I hear variation in the other
      dashes.

      I have one of Phil Boyle's excellent and accurate reproductions of the
      Marconi Lever key (Guillotine key) used on Titanic - and I can send as
      fast on that as I can on a 365. The 365 is smoother than the Lever
      key and both have heavy spark duty contacts.

      I do not have a program with which to measure the length of the code
      elements except with great difficulty. It is easy with Adobe Audion,
      but I cannot find my copy of the program, so I used the free Audacity
      and the only easy way to measure a dot or dash is to trim the waveform
      down to the dot/dash and measure the length of the whole file. Too
      time consuming for me. But I did report on the inconsistant dash that
      I did measure this way.

      73

      DR

      On Dec 23, 2007 8:45 PM, Peter Hewitson <peterhewitson@...> wrote:
      >
      > Just one thing David, on British ships, the use of vibro keys or bug keys of
      > any kind was frowned upon and the key itself was usually bolted to the
      > operating desk. When I was a junior sparks in 1965 on the "Empress of
      > Canada" GHLA, I wasn't even allowed to alter the setting. I had to put up
      > with spring tension being much too tight and I ended up with muscle tension
      > or "glass arm". It was only later on, around 1970-ish that electronic keys
      > and bug keys became popular on British ships.
      >
      > It's highly unlikely that Jack Phillips or Harold Bride would be using a bug
      > key on the maiden voyage of the Titanic and all the photos of the original
      > Titanic morse key is of a large brass hand key.
      >
      > The recording is so obviously one of a bug key because the dots just "slide"
      > and it's very difficult, but not impossible to send like that with an
      > "up-and-downer"
      >
      > 73
      > Peter
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