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Re: [cw_bugs] Re: [skcc] Re: SOS de MGY - Titanic - Real? or Fake?

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  • Adam Taylor
    I have questions about this: The speed...im ok with a straight key, im sure there are some old timers who are exceptional at it, but if that was being sent
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 16 1:36 AM
      I have questions about this:
       
       The speed...im ok with a straight key, im sure there are some old timers who are exceptional at it, but if that was being sent with a straight key...wow! the dits were perfect, at least bug quality...im not so sure even the best telegrapher would be so perfectly consistent. He would have to have arms like Popeye! But im definately open to the possibility...so this one is plausible, but still questionable.
       
       The conditions...I agree with another poster who mentioned a lack of QSB or other atmospheric anomalies. Also plausible, but just how good were the front end receivers of the era...most boat anchor owners will tell you, the rx is the first to suffer on those old rigs, even the big ones like MCE.
       
       The recording...this one stands out more than others. I make a living recording things and i was wondering the most about this. The signal was solid, the recording was solid,  the year was 1912...how good was A) the receiver,  B) the recording equipment, and C) the luck of the op to stumble across this signal when no other ship was around and/or answering...enough to set up a recording device that could record that clearly and on such short notice. This is not only possible today, but easy...im not so sure it was all that easy in 1912, but again, i could be wrong.
       
       The significance...The sinking of the RMS Titanic was a HUGE deal. If someone had recorded the actual sinking, i would have to think that this would have been made public long ago, if for nothing else, the investigation of the White Star Lines operational practices...the SOS call would have been of immense importance. especially if it was recorded from a commercial station, this would have been huge for them. How many actual SOS recordings were floating around in 1912? The high profile of the sinking would also be motivation for making a replica years later (especially since all the movies that have been made since) and trying to pass it off as real...its a lot more exciting than say, the recording of a tanker sinking in 1973. This one would garner lots of attention for the person who first presented it, and sooner or later it would make its way to the ham radio community as it has, where it would face certain scrutiny...as it is.
       
       I am not buying it at first glance, but i truly like being wrong. If this ends up being proven to be the actual sinking then this is exciting stuff. But im going to have to stick with my gut feeling...its a fake. 
       
      73...Adam, N7YA

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "David Ring"
      To: brasspounders@yahoogroups.com, skcc@yahoogroups.com, cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "Radio Officers &c"
      Subject: [cw_bugs] Re: [skcc] Re: SOS de MGY - Titanic - Real? or Fake?
      Date: Sun, 16 Dec 2007 02:22:59 -0500

      Someone suggested that the recording was false because:


      The signal strength stayed the same throughout the transmission.
      Rarely is there propagation where there isn't some QSB noticeable (however faint) in a transmission of that length.

      Here is some more information:

      The frequency in use was 600 meters - the distance from Titanic to Cape Race Radio / MCE (using just the present location of Cape Race, Newfoundland as I don't know the exact QTH of MCE) is

      366 statute miles, 318 nautical miles or 589 nautical miles.  The bearing from Titanic/MGY was 339 degrees true.

      At such a distance, fading (QSB) was very rare except for a sudden ionospheric disturbance or aurora.


      73

      David N1EA


      --

      rock.com

    • w9ya@qrparci.net
      Interesting comments. I, by chance, converted the recording to an mp3 with just enough bandwidth to accomplish a clean output. This of course removed the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 16 7:39 AM
        Interesting comments.

        I, by chance, converted the recording to an mp3 with just enough bandwidth
        to accomplish a clean output. This of course removed the noise. The result
        was PERFECTLY timed code. i.e. It sounded machine generated.

        Vy 73;

        Bob
        w9ya

        > I have questions about this: The speed...im ok with a straight key, im
        > sure there are some old timers who are exceptional at it, but if that
        > was being sent with a straight key...wow! the dits were perfect, at
        > least bug quality...im not so sure even the best telegrapher would be so
        > perfectly consistent. He would have to have arms like Popeye! But im
        > definately open to the possibility...so this one is plausible, but still
        > questionable. The conditions...I agree with another poster who
        > mentioned a lack of QSB or other atmospheric anomalies. Also plausible,
        > but just how good were the front end receivers of the era...most boat
        > anchor owners will tell you, the rx is the first to suffer on those old
        > rigs, even the big ones like MCE. The recording...this one stands out
        > more than others. I make a living recording things and i was wondering
        > the most about this. The signal was solid, the recording was solid, the
        > year was 1912...how good was A) the receiver, B) the recording
        > equipment, and C) the luck of the op to stumble across this signal when
        > no other ship was around and/or answering...enough to set up a recording
        > device that could record that clearly and on such short notice. This is
        > not only possible today, but easy...im not so sure it was all that easy
        > in 1912, but again, i could be wrong. The significance...The sinking of
        > the RMS Titanic was a HUGE deal. If someone had recorded the actual
        > sinking, i would have to think that this would have been made public
        > long ago, if for nothing else, the investigation of the White Star Lines
        > operational practices...the SOS call would have been of immense
        > importance.
        > especially if it was recorded from a commercial station, this would have
        > been huge for them. How many actual SOS recordings were floating around
        > in 1912? The high profile of the sinking would also be motivation for
        > making a replica years later (especially since all the movies that have
        > been made since) and trying to pass it off as real...its a lot more
        > exciting than say, the recording of a tanker sinking in 1973. This one
        > would garner lots of attention for the person who first presented it,
        > and sooner or later it would make its way to the ham radio community as
        > it has, where it would face certain scrutiny...as it is. I am not
        > buying it at first glance, but i truly like being wrong. If this ends up
        > being proven to be the actual sinking then this is exciting stuff. But
        > im going to have to stick with my gut feeling...its a fake. 73...Adam,
        > N7YA
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "David Ring"
        > To: brasspounders@yahoogroups.com, skcc@yahoogroups.com,
        > cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "Radio Officers &c"
        > Subject: [cw_bugs] Re: [skcc] Re: SOS de MGY - Titanic - Real? or
        > Fake?
        > Date: Sun, 16 Dec 2007 02:22:59 -0500
        >
        > Someone suggested that the recording was false because:
        >
        >
        > The signal strength stayed the same throughout the transmission.
        > Rarely is there propagation where there isn't some QSB noticeable
        > (however faint) in a transmission of that length.
        > Here is some more information:
        >
        > The frequency in use was 600 meters - the distance from Titanic to
        > Cape Race Radio / MCE (using just the present location of Cape Race,
        > Newfoundland as I don't know the exact QTH of MCE) is
        >
        > 366 statute miles, 318 nautical miles or 589 nautical miles. The
        > bearing from Titanic/MGY was 339 degrees true.
        >
        > At such a distance, fading (QSB) was very rare except for a sudden
        > ionospheric disturbance or aurora.
        >
        >
        > 73
        >
        > David N1EA
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > You Rock! Your E-Mail Should Too! Signup Now at Rock.com and get 250MB
        > of Storage!
        >
        > http://webmail.rock.com/signup/


        Liviu Librescu - În veci pomenirea lui.
        (May his memory be eternal.)
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