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Re: Looking for...

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  • w2blc
    I wanted a case for my Johnson SpeedX bug. Decided to build one. First was pine and the second was maple. I have new and great respect for craftsmen making
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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      I wanted a case for my Johnson SpeedX bug. Decided to build one. First
      was pine and the second was maple.

      I have new and great respect for craftsmen making fine jewelry boxes
      for their wife or girlfriend. It is tedious work making something
      small, strong, and eye appealing.

      Brass hinges and latch with brass handle on the maple box. Leather on
      the pine box.

      I can tell you that the $100 case from Vibroplex is not a bad idea.
      Unless, you have the time and equipment to work with.
    • k4oso@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/28/2006 5:26:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Do you have plans/specs for the SpeedX bug case? Would like to build one. By the way, were
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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        In a message dated 10/28/2006 5:26:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        w2blc@... writes:

        > I wanted a case for my Johnson SpeedX bug. Decided to build one. First
        > was pine and the second was maple.
        >
        >
        Do you have plans/specs for the SpeedX bug case? Would like to build one.
        By the way, were you satisfied with the look of yours compared to the Vibroplex
        case?
        73, Milt k4oso


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David J. Ring, Jr.
        Unless you re a woodworker - which I am not - I don t think that the $75 (approx.) price of the second from Vibroplex is that out of line. They have two top
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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          Unless you're a woodworker - which I am not - I don't think that the $75 (approx.) price of the "second" from Vibroplex is that out of line. They have two top hinges (or a piano hinge), latch(es?), handle, perhaps metal corner bumpers, name plate, wood, work.

          To me that's a no-brainer. "My case" will be worth $2.00, Vibroplex's case will be worth $40.00.

          I am not a builder - I can't see that well.

          73
          DR
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: k4oso@...
          To: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, October 28, 2006 6:19 PM
          Subject: Re: [cw_bugs] Re: Looking for...


          In a message dated 10/28/2006 5:26:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          w2blc@... writes:

          > I wanted a case for my Johnson SpeedX bug. Decided to build one. First
          > was pine and the second was maple.
          >
          >
          Do you have plans/specs for the SpeedX bug case? Would like to build one.
          By the way, were you satisfied with the look of yours compared to the Vibroplex
          case?
          73, Milt k4oso

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • k4oso@aol.com
          In a message dated 10/28/2006 9:07:42 PM Eastern Daylight Time, n1ea@arrl.net ... Oh, I think the Vibroplex case (wooden) is probably a pretty good value. I
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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            In a message dated 10/28/2006 9:07:42 PM Eastern Daylight Time, n1ea@...
            writes:

            > Unless you're a woodworker - which I am not - I don't think that the $75
            > (approx.) price of the "second" from Vibroplex is that out of line. They have
            > two top hinges (or a piano hinge), latch(es?), handle, perhaps metal corner
            > bumpers, name plate, wood, work.
            >
            Oh, I think the Vibroplex case (wooden) is probably a pretty good value. I
            just don't particularly like the look of it. To me, its too blond and looks
            like a file box. However, if I weren't a woodworker it still would be my first
            choice of a way to go. I 'd like to make one more along the lines of the old
            square cross-section case. Also, I think a darker (or figured) wood would
            look a lot nicer. It should be a fun project (maybe this winter). The big
            challenge will be deciding which bug comes first.
            73, Milt



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David J. Ring, Jr.
            Call Vibroplex and ask if you can buy one before they are varnished. Or ask if you can have the maker of the cases stain yours a particular color. The old
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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              Call Vibroplex and ask if you can buy one before they are varnished. Or ask
              if you can have the maker of the cases stain yours a particular color.

              The old cases were soft pine, and covered with thin plastic "shelf liner" -
              which Vibroplex called "Moroccon Leatherette" - or something like that.
              (Genuine Replica !)

              If you dropped one of those cases, it would fragment open. I believe the
              newer cases are MUCH better made.

              So buy one of them - take the hinges apart, strip it and stain it.

              Certainly a LOT less work than doing cabinet work. I don't have one here -
              but if I remember correctly, the top is routed out so that it fits like a
              step, and the hinges are also routed out so they're recessed. I do remember
              that it was a very good job of cabinet making - I don't remember how the
              joins were made - but I don't think it was glued and stapled with a
              pneumatic gun! I think it was quite a good job.

              73
              DR
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: k4oso@...
              To: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, October 28, 2006 9:38 PM
              Subject: Re: [cw_bugs] Re: Looking for...


              In a message dated 10/28/2006 9:07:42 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
              n1ea@...
              writes:

              > Unless you're a woodworker - which I am not - I don't think that the $75
              > (approx.) price of the "second" from Vibroplex is that out of line. They
              > have
              > two top hinges (or a piano hinge), latch(es?), handle, perhaps metal
              > corner
              > bumpers, name plate, wood, work.
              >
              Oh, I think the Vibroplex case (wooden) is probably a pretty good value. I
              just don't particularly like the look of it. To me, its too blond and looks
              like a file box. However, if I weren't a woodworker it still would be my
              first
              choice of a way to go. I 'd like to make one more along the lines of the old
              square cross-section case. Also, I think a darker (or figured) wood would
              look a lot nicer. It should be a fun project (maybe this winter). The big
              challenge will be deciding which bug comes first.
              73, Milt


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              Version: 7.5.428 / Virus Database: 268.13.17/505 - Release Date: 10/27/2006
              3:15 PM
            • w2blc
              This winter I ll build another case. This will be for the bug to live in and be used from - without having to remove same from the case. Same flip-top as the
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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                This winter I'll build another case. This will be for the bug to live
                in and be used from - without having to remove same from the case.
                Same "flip-top" as the Vibroplex cases had (original black leatherette
                covered telegrapher's case) - for the same purpose.

                You brought your key to work with you. Sat down and opened the case.
                Then you pulled the wire with the wedge on it out and put the wedge
                between the desk key's contacts. You were now ready for your 8 hour
                shift. Clickity clack!

                If, and I say again IF, I decide to build any cases - they will be of
                this style. I will have to build jigs for the project and redesign the
                type of joinery used. Have to see what the winter brings. I'll post a
                picture when the first "operator's case" is finished.

                In case you have not visited my site - take a look at:
                http://www.radiotelegraphy.net/
              • David J. Ring, Jr.
                At the different radiotelegraph stations I worked at, bugs were stored in cubby holes - each operator had one for mail, work notices, and storing small items
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 28, 2006
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                  At the different radiotelegraph stations I worked at, bugs were stored in
                  "cubby holes" - each operator had one for mail, work notices, and storing
                  small items - such as your bug and headset.

                  The station always furnished a station key - which usually was a Johnson or
                  Nye Viking oval straight key with no shorting bar, but the shorting bar lip
                  was perfect for inserting the wedge that was sold by Vibroplex, McElroy, and
                  furnished by Western Union and others to their operators. As electronic
                  keyers became common the station also furnished a phone jack for inserting
                  the keyer (or a phone plug for your key).

                  There was no need of a shorting bar for commercial radiotelegraphy at larger
                  stations because the transmitters were usually remoted from the receiver
                  site - usually 5 to 30 miles away.

                  However, I've never ever seen anyone operate a bug from inside a box. The
                  box was just to keep dust off the key and allow transportation from storage
                  to operator's desk.

                  The Japanese Hi-Mound bug with the plastic cover is the only bug I've ever
                  seen used in a "covered" state!

                  When the "watch" was over, the operator would take his headset and key and
                  "secure" the watch and pass it off to the new watchstander.

                  73

                  David J. Ring, Jr., N1EA

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: w2blc
                  <snip>
                  This winter I'll build another case. This will be for the bug to live
                  in and be used from - without having to remove same from the case. <snip>
                  You brought your key to work with you. Sat down and opened the case. Then
                  you pulled the wire with the wedge on it out and put the wedge between the
                  desk key's contacts. You were now ready for your 8 hour shift. Clickity
                  clack!
                  <snip>
                • w2blc
                  None of our ops left their bugs at work. Too much chance that someone might need to use it. Or, decide to play with it as a joke or........ Even back in
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 29, 2006
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                    None of our ops left their bugs at work. Too much chance that someone
                    might "need" to use it. Or, decide to "play" with it as a joke
                    or........ Even back in the good old days, not everyone was so honest
                    and wonderful.

                    The single draw back of using the bug inside of the case was no speed
                    adjustment was available. They sure were quiet though.

                    However, on those circuits it didn't matter much. They ran 25 - 30 wpm
                    all day every day.
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