Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [cw_bugs] varispeed

Expand Messages
  • David Ring
    Fred - everything you do is so beautiful! Regarding 25 wpm on a hand key, you re fast! I still have a challange out for anyone who can produce a recording of
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12 7:29 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Fred - everything you do is so beautiful!

      Regarding 25 wpm on a hand key, you're fast! I still have a challange
      out for anyone who can produce a recording of 25 wpm on a hand key.

      So far, I've had three people who said they could do it, but when they
      measured it, they found that they could not.

      I have a commercial first-class telegraph license which was tested to
      send and receive at 25 wpm. Fortunatly for me the USA is the only
      country where we are allowed to use a semi-automatic key for sending
      and a typewriter for receiving. The other code tests (20 wpm code
      groups) have to be done by hand with pen and hand key.

      I learned the virtues of a hand key by operating on 500 kHz during
      QRN. You can really control a hand key like you can't control any
      other key other than a sideswiper.

      One ex RAF CW operator applied for a job as a maritime sparks - and he
      was turned down because he couldn't send like a merchant operator - we
      prolong our dots so they can make it through the QRN.

      73

      DR
      On 3/11/07, Trail Fox <KT5X@...> wrote:
      >
      > DR knows of what he speaks when saying that Hills was the first to introduce the varispeed. I think that was about 1951.
      >
      > And I did not measure the speed of the dits of the bug with the weight soldered to it, only estimated it, and certainly would be most fortunate if my estimate came within a mere 1 wpm, hi.
      >
      > To steve, yes, I think the varispeed is better for slowing a bug down, and for just plain using a bug than the pendulum extension.
      >
      > but i don't share your enthusiasm for a straight key. Please do have at it, but for me, Morse becomes laborious below about 25 wpm because it loses its language characteristic and returns to being a cipher. Since I can't make 25 wpm Cw with a straight key for more than a few minutes, it is a bug and a pddle for me.
      >
      > DR, I coveted the original FYO paddle when I was a youngster, so much so, that I made my own rendition of it. my rendition, from the 1963 QST article, was a dual lever, and possibly the first dual lever version of the FYO's idea, I don't know. It was 1963 well before Bencher, and before FYO produced the paddle. I still have that paddle, and other than being light because I built it on a walnut base, it works very well.
      >
      > The wood was cut by hand. The levers were hand cut with a hacksaw, and bent in a vise. The contact posts borrowed from a J-36. The pins supporting the levers are nails filed to a point. The ratio from pivot to contact versus pivot to finger piece is 1.5:1 such that the gap is made to feel smaller than it really is. The key can be adjusted to where you can not feel it move.
      >
      > 73,
      >
      > FD kt5x
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.