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Re: Blue Racer update N1EA Tips and Pointers

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  • k4oso
    I consider myself a bug man but...I ve never had to operate one when it HAD to be done! Some of the best advice I ve received on bug operating has come from
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 27, 2012
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      I consider myself a bug man but...I've never had to operate one when it HAD to be done! Some of the best advice I've received on bug operating has come from David, N1EA. The piece of advice he gave me that cured my "scratch" dots was to add tension to the dot spring. Sounds so simple.....yet great results.
      We have a great resource in this "old timer" and my advice is, despite what your instincts tell you, TRY HIS ADVICE FIRST. It could vastly improve your "wheel invention" average. :-) Take it from one who took a while to get it.
      If you can swing it, get on the air with David and you will be surprised how quickly he can diagnose your bug's issues and prescribe a cure.
      73, Milt k4oso

      --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Chandler <chandlerusm@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well, I had a chance this morning to try out a few things. In no
      > particular order these are my notes on suggestions from the list - I
      > apologize if I overlooked something, but I think I've got them all.
      >
      > 1. The dot spring (metal u-shaped leaf spring) appears to be roughly the
      > same stiffness as my two others. It's much newer, maybe it's a tad stiffer.
      >
      > 2. I have the Vibroplex burnishing strip, and have gone over the contacts a
      > few times recently to make sure nothing was dirty.
      >
      > 3. Yes, when it was sending scratchy dits it did require adjusting the dit
      > stop screw.
      >
      > 4. I checked all base screws, they were tight.
      >
      > 5. The silver contacts on both sides of the dit connection feel solid.
      >
      > I made a few adjustments based on Dave, N1EA's document. I had it set up
      > for a pretty wide spacing, which is not my preference but I was hesitant to
      > tighten it down until it began to behave itself. So, I bit the bullet and
      > adjusted it down for a small travel on the dits and dahs.
      >
      > Upon very close inspection it looked as though the pendulum arm was not
      > always contacting the damper during sending. I had it set to just *BARELY*
      > rest against the damper. I added a bit more resting force and now it looks
      > like it reliably touches the damper.
      >
      > I also loosened the screw holding the donut-shaped mount for the dot
      > spring. Based on the lack of a grounding braid, I wanted to make sure there
      > wasn't any corrosion making a poor contact.
      >
      > After doing these 3 things, it is working much better. It will hold the
      > settings, and perhaps only one dot in ten or fifteen is scratchy. It will
      > make about 30 or so before coming to rest fully closed, and it comes to
      > rest fully closed at both the slowest weight setting and the fastest. I
      > have it set for a somewhat heavy dot at the slowest speed, and it's OK at
      > the highest, though a tad light.
      >
      > I re-read the posts and realize I forgot to look at the Dot tension spring
      > - I never paid much attention to it on the others, but now I see on this
      > new Blue Racer it is part of the electrical path. I'm going to go over
      > that carefully tonight.
      >
      >
      > Thanks to all for the guidance - it has been a great help!
      >
      > 73 de Chuck, WS1L
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      >
      > ===================
      > Chuck Chandler
      > chandlerusm@...
      > ===================
      >
    • Donnie
      Milt: I have done that many times by using a tiny piece of foam wedged back into the inside of the dit springs U bend. Donnie
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 27, 2012
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        Milt:
        I have done that many times by using a tiny piece of foam wedged back into the inside of the dit springs U bend.

        Donnie

        On Jun 27, 2012 5:25 PM, "k4oso" <k4oso@...> wrote:
         

        I consider myself a bug man but...I've never had to operate one when it HAD to be done! Some of the best advice I've received on bug operating has come from David, N1EA. The piece of advice he gave me that cured my "scratch" dots was to add tension to the dot spring. Sounds so simple.....yet great results.
        We have a great resource in this "old timer" and my advice is, despite what your instincts tell you, TRY HIS ADVICE FIRST. It could vastly improve your "wheel invention" average. :-) Take it from one who took a while to get it.
        If you can swing it, get on the air with David and you will be surprised how quickly he can diagnose your bug's issues and prescribe a cure.
        73, Milt k4oso

        --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Chandler <chandlerusm@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, I had a chance this morning to try out a few things. In no
        > particular order these are my notes on suggestions from the list - I
        > apologize if I overlooked something, but I think I've got them all.
        >
        > 1. The dot spring (metal u-shaped leaf spring) appears to be roughly the
        > same stiffness as my two others. It's much newer, maybe it's a tad stiffer.
        >
        > 2. I have the Vibroplex burnishing strip, and have gone over the contacts a
        > few times recently to make sure nothing was dirty.
        >
        > 3. Yes, when it was sending scratchy dits it did require adjusting the dit
        > stop screw.
        >
        > 4. I checked all base screws, they were tight.
        >
        > 5. The silver contacts on both sides of the dit connection feel solid.
        >
        > I made a few adjustments based on Dave, N1EA's document. I had it set up
        > for a pretty wide spacing, which is not my preference but I was hesitant to
        > tighten it down until it began to behave itself. So, I bit the bullet and
        > adjusted it down for a small travel on the dits and dahs.
        >
        > Upon very close inspection it looked as though the pendulum arm was not
        > always contacting the damper during sending. I had it set to just *BARELY*
        > rest against the damper. I added a bit more resting force and now it looks
        > like it reliably touches the damper.
        >
        > I also loosened the screw holding the donut-shaped mount for the dot
        > spring. Based on the lack of a grounding braid, I wanted to make sure there
        > wasn't any corrosion making a poor contact.
        >
        > After doing these 3 things, it is working much better. It will hold the
        > settings, and perhaps only one dot in ten or fifteen is scratchy. It will
        > make about 30 or so before coming to rest fully closed, and it comes to
        > rest fully closed at both the slowest weight setting and the fastest. I
        > have it set for a somewhat heavy dot at the slowest speed, and it's OK at
        > the highest, though a tad light.
        >
        > I re-read the posts and realize I forgot to look at the Dot tension spring
        > - I never paid much attention to it on the others, but now I see on this
        > new Blue Racer it is part of the electrical path. I'm going to go over
        > that carefully tonight.
        >
        >
        > Thanks to all for the guidance - it has been a great help!
        >
        > 73 de Chuck, WS1L
        >
        >
        > --
        >
        >
        > ===================
        > Chuck Chandler
        > chandlerusm@...
        > ===================
        >

      • cloud runner
        This cures split dits, which is different from sratchy dits which I spoke to a moment ago. A dit spring that is weak will produce split dits, and dit bounce.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 27, 2012
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          This cures split dits, which is different from sratchy dits which I spoke to a moment ago.
           
          A dit spring that is weak will produce split dits, and dit bounce.  McElroy had a dit tensioner on some of his bugs to load the spring.  Another way to do it, is to stick a small piece of foam in the curvature of the dit spring.
           
          But understand, that will fix split dits and contact bounce, while the capcitor across the bug or keying a relay will cure contact scratchiness.
           
          Dave, N1EA, is "the man" ;-)
           
          fd - kt5x
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: k4oso
          Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 1:42 PM
          Subject: [cw_bugs] Re: Blue Racer update N1EA Tips and Pointers

           

          I consider myself a bug man but...I've never had to operate one when it HAD to be done! Some of the best advice I've received on bug operating has come from David, N1EA. The piece of advice he gave me that cured my "scratch" dots was to add tension to the dot spring. Sounds so simple.....yet great results.
          We have a great resource in this "old timer" and my advice is, despite what your instincts tell you, TRY HIS ADVICE FIRST. It could vastly improve your "wheel invention" average. :-) Take it from one who took a while to get it.
          If you can swing it, get on the air with David and you will be surprised how quickly he can diagnose your bug's issues and prescribe a cure.
          73, Milt k4oso

          --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, Chuck Chandler <chandlerusm@...> wrote:
          >
          > Well, I had a chance this morning to try out a few things. In no
          > particular order these are my notes on suggestions from the list - I
          > apologize if I overlooked something, but I think I've got them all.
          >
          > 1. The dot spring (metal u-shaped leaf spring) appears to be roughly the
          > same stiffness as my two others. It's much newer, maybe it's a tad stiffer.
          >
          > 2. I have the Vibroplex burnishing strip, and have gone over the contacts a
          > few times recently to make sure nothing was dirty.
          >
          > 3. Yes, when it was sending scratchy dits it did require adjusting the dit
          > stop screw.
          >
          > 4. I checked all base screws, they were tight.
          >
          > 5. The silver contacts on both sides of the dit connection feel solid.
          >
          > I made a few adjustments based on Dave, N1EA's document. I had it set up
          > for a pretty wide spacing, which is not my preference but I was hesitant to
          > tighten it down until it began to behave itself. So, I bit the bullet and
          > adjusted it down for a small travel on the dits and dahs.
          >
          > Upon very close inspection it looked as though the pendulum arm was not
          > always contacting the damper during sending. I had it set to just *BARELY*
          > rest against the damper. I added a bit more resting force and now it looks
          > like it reliably touches the damper.
          >
          > I also loosened the screw holding the donut-shaped mount for the dot
          > spring. Based on the lack of a grounding braid, I wanted to make sure there
          > wasn't any corrosion making a poor contact.
          >
          > After doing these 3 things, it is working much better. It will hold the
          > settings, and perhaps only one dot in ten or fifteen is scratchy. It will
          > make about 30 or so before coming to rest fully closed, and it comes to
          > rest fully closed at both the slowest weight setting and the fastest. I
          > have it set for a somewhat heavy dot at the slowest speed, and it's OK at
          > the highest, though a tad light.
          >
          > I re-read the posts and realize I forgot to look at the Dot tension spring
          > - I never paid much attention to it on the others, but now I see on this
          > new Blue Racer it is part of the electrical path. I'm going to go over
          > that carefully tonight.
          >
          >
          > Thanks to all for the guidance - it has been a great help!
          >
          > 73 de Chuck, WS1L
          >
          >
          > --
          >
          >
          > ===================
          > Chuck Chandler
          > chandlerusm@...
          > ===================
          >

        • Joe V31JP
          I find a conflict in your statement, Fred. Here is the definition of burnish, burnishing. Definition of /BURNISH/ transitive verb 1: /a: /to make shiny or
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 27, 2012
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            I find a conflict in your statement, Fred.

            Here is the definition of burnish, burnishing.

            Definition of BURNISH

            transitive verb

            1: a: to make shiny or lustrous especially by rubbing b : polish

            2: to rub (a material) with a tool for compacting or smoothing or for turning an edge

            — bur·nish·er noun

            — bur·nish·ing adjective or noun

            bur·nish/ˈbərniSH/

            Verb: Polish (something, esp. metal) by rubbing: "burnished armor".

            Noun: The shine on a highly polished surface.

            Synonyms:       verb.  polish - furbish - buff - gloss - glaze

            noun.  polish - sheen - gloss - lustre – luster

            Burnishing is the plastic deformation of a surface due to sliding contact with another object. Visually, burnishing smears the texture of a rough surface and makes it shinier.

            Burnishing may occur on any sliding surface if the contact stress locally exceeds the yield strength of the material.


            Proper burnishing IS polishing.There are a couple of inherit problems out there.  Not all so called burnishing tools are that.  A proper burnishing tool is
            a metal blade that is covered with a fine (flour) diamond surface.  It is for the purpose of polish a surface, no filing it.  It can be used in different ways.
            A burnishing tool can be used to polish an arbour/pivot and if done correctly it will harden the surface in the process.  That can or cannot be desired,
            depending on the application of the pivot.

            All so called burnishing tools are not that, but a instead are a piece of metal that has been knurled, i.e. more like a file. Not as good as a true burnishing
            tool.  Also, the proper application of a burnishing tool is not.  As defined, it is to polish and the pressure is ever so light.  A properly burnished surface is
            mirror-like.

            A proper burnishing tool could be assigned a grit number of 2000 or higher.

            Burnishing moves the material about, not removing it.  If you are reshaping the contact, giving it a dome, it takes a lot of working with burnishing, because
            if you go too fast, the surface is hardened and the moving of metal will stop.

            I suspect your experience with burnishing may have involved poor or pseudo burnishing tools.  When I place a burnishing tool on or between contacts,
            the pressure is not high.  It should remove soft, relatively, crud as it polished the contacts metal surface.  I clean my burnishing tools with alcohol before
            and after each use so i am not depositing crud I may have picked up from another contact or my finger even.

            Sorry to disagree, only in part, Fred.

            On 6/27/2012 4:16 PM, cloud runner wrote:
            Contacts should be polished, not burnished with a vibroplex tool.  Polish them on a polishing wheel, make them mirror shiny and both convex.  This will most reduce the problem itself.

            -- 
            161, Joe, Ronnie(Rowena), Marty & Sidney Pontek
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            Also, K8JP, member FOC1743,CWops876,QCWA-LM21894,OOTC4607,A1OP,SKCC3171T,NAQCC5798,FISTS7625CC951,FP-2819
            LotW  Skype: v31joepalooka
            http://www.justanswer.com/lp-1eh8-tool-repair
            I am looking for Vibroplex Model X, Double lever, Zephyr, Lionel J-36 and prefer basket cases to restore.


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