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  • KT5X
    * Yes, putting the left hand over the top of bugs set backwards is a well known and long used technique for sending left-handed with a right-handed bug. It
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 20, 2006
      * Yes, putting the left hand over the top of bugs set backwards is a well known and long used technique for sending left-handed with a right-handed bug. It was commonly used while logging in a contest with the right hand while sending at the same time.

      No, you would not do that with a paddle. Turn the paddle around correctly and tell the keyer, "reverse!"

      * You can easily increase the weight on a Champion by stacking washers between the screw and the weight. A longer screw may accomodate more washers. Weights on the pre-1930 Lightnings were bigger than after.

      * the slowest bug ever made may be the Simplex-Auto. It is a right-angle bug made from 1922 to about 1955 in Australia. It uses a release mechanism like the Mecographs.

      slow speeds are useful for learning, but there is a reason bugs are called "speed-keys."

      * the vari-speeds, originally made by Hills in the early fifties when they were known as "speed-changers," are terrific for slowing down bugs, especially the older Racers with the U-shaped dampers. On that bug, the vari-speed can be directed straight back, unimpeded by the damper, providing speeds down into the single-digits. Ragardless of slowing them down, they are very convenient for changing speed.

      * using a straight key... I think some are using a straight key incorrectly. dots and dashes are NOT made with a muscle expression of the fingers. Place one or two fingers on top of the finger piece, arch the wrist upward off the table, elbow on the table. The code is created with a pumping action of the wrist. High speed dots and dashes are made with a reflexive or spasmadic expression of the tendons, not with any muscle contraction and relaxation which is much too slow and inaccurate. It is the curved wrist and the tension on the tendons that led to carpal-tunnel.

      * making dashes with a bug ... I think some are trying to do this with the muscles of the fingers. No, no. Elbow on the table, wrist off the table, swing fromt he wrist or elbow, dashes are made with a spasmadic or reflexive action of the tendons, not muscle contractions which are too slow and too inaccurate.

      * controlling a paddle... use the lightest resistance and smallest gap you can handle. This is done with the wrist ont he table and relaxed, the fingers squeezing, barely moving at all. OT's who learned the bug first, often never learn to do this because they swing at it like a bug. works, but not the best.

      Good luck!

      73, Fred - kt5x



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