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Re: [cw_bugs] New file uploaded to cw_bugs

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  • F. Richard Burt
    Good Afternoon, Fellow Buggy Hams: My father and I liked to Rag Chew with other hams, even the Novice boys who were still having trouble with 5 words per
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 23, 2011
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      Good Afternoon, Fellow Buggy Hams:
       
      My father and I liked to Rag Chew with other hams, even the Novice boys
      who were still having trouble with 5 words per minute speeds.  In a pick-up
      equipment issue from Texas Army MARS, I obtained my very own Vibroplex bug
      for my very own.  The positioning spring was VERY stiff, and the ditttsss
      ran way too fast, even with the weight as far out on the pendulum movement
      as I could place it.  So, handy man that I can be, sometimes, I thought
      about it overnight, and work up from a dead sleep with the "solution."
       
      Fetching a fine-toothed metal file from my toolbox, I took careful aim
      at the top edge of the spring and filed a notch in the spring.  Then,
      I fired up the transmitter and "tested" it.  For semi-automatic keying
      at slow words-per-minute, that flat spring was still way too stiff.  So,
      I turned the bug over and used my file on what was then the bottom edge
      of the spring, (being up-side-down, I could gently press down with each
      file-stroke and the amount of vertical mass at that point of the spring
      was now beginning to "look" narrow.  Better test again.  The performance
      now was quite good for a speed of about 10 words-per-minute speed.  Since
      my goal was to bring it down to 5 words-per-minute, I continued to file
      the bottom edge of that spring, and tested after each set of about six
      strokes of the file. 
       
      Sure enough, when I reached the place where the spring was "proper" to
      rebulate the ditttssss evenly with the DAHs, the amount of steel left
      was visible no more than about 1/8-inch.  Fatigue might be a possibility,
       but this adjustment in physical properties was inexpensive, interesting,
      and successful in 1958, and it is still in good shape.
       
      Richard Meiss, WB9LPU, your bug is beautifull, ...and shines quite well. 
      The Government didn't attempt to protect their stuff.  All it had to do
      was work when plugged into a transmitter.  Let me pose my opinion, with
      no hands-on experience with your proposed corrective action using magnets.
       
      The "natural" feel of the corrective action with my bug has no quirkiness. 
      All of the physical properties "slowed" equally as I filed the steel
      spring for less top-to-bottom mass.  Just an idea worth consideration,
      since I am now a reporting committee of one, uninvited to comment on the
      subject. <grins>
       
      73s
       
      Dick
       
      F. Richard Burt
      W5QQM
       
      Garland, Texas
       
         
       
      .
      which I think could make placement and regulation of the counter-forces
      necessary to compensate for too-rigid a return/restore spring  
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 8:35 PM
      Subject: [cw_bugs] New file uploaded to cw_bugs

       


      Hello,

      This email message is a notification to let you know that
      a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the cw_bugs
      group.

      File : /BugNapper 6.pdf
      Uploaded by : richard_meiss <wb9lpu@...>
      Description : Another approach to slowing a bug

      You can access this file at the URL:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cw_bugs/files/BugNapper%206.pdf

      To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
      http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
      Regards,

      richard_meiss <wb9lpu@...>


    • richard_meiss
      Hi, Dick - I guess that it took a bit more nerve that I have to attack the mainspring of a bug, especially since it is riveted in place and your modification
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 23, 2011
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        Hi, Dick -

        I guess that it took a bit more nerve that I have to attack the
        mainspring of a bug, especially since it is riveted in place and your
        modification was pretty permanent. But if it worked for you, then it
        did its job. A potential problem with reducing the dimensions of the
        spring from the top and bottom is that it reduces the strength of the
        spring to bear the downward force of the weight on the pendulum. One
        way around this is to use a Dremel tool with a small abrasive wheel and
        remove a "slot" of material from the center of the spring. This
        preserves its width and reduces its lateral stiffness with little effect
        on the vertical strength. But it is still not reversible.

        I took some time to clean up the bug before taking the photographs,
        because it is my pride and joy. My father gave it to me in 1957 as a
        combination General license and birthday present. Actually, he brought
        home a Lafayette Radio bug (aka Skillman, "coffin bug", Hi-Mound, etc.).
        It was a nice bug in its own right, but my father saw in my face that I
        had really had my heart set on a Vibroplex, so he traded it in for one.
        It has stayed with me for many moves and escaped being cut down to make
        a CW paddle. To shine it up without damaging the chrome, I used a Mr.
        Clean Magic Eraser sponge. That item leaves no residue and has no
        abrasive effect either on the chrome or the crackle finish of the base.
        I would be careful about using it on one of the "Japanned" bases of the
        older Vibroplexes.

        A YouTube video of the BugNapper is in the works and should be
        finished before too long.

        73 de Rich, WB9LPU


        --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "F. Richard Burt" <BrazosValley@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Good Afternoon, Fellow Buggy Hams:
        >
        > My father and I liked to Rag Chew with other hams, even the Novice
        boys
        > who were still having trouble with 5 words per minute speeds. In a
        pick-up
        > equipment issue from Texas Army MARS, I obtained my very own Vibroplex
        bug
        > for my very own. The positioning spring was VERY stiff, and the
        ditttsss
        > ran way too fast, even with the weight as far out on the pendulum
        movement
        > as I could place it. So, handy man that I can be, sometimes, I
        thought
        > about it overnight, and work up from a dead sleep with the "solution."
        >
        > Fetching a fine-toothed metal file from my toolbox, I took careful aim
        > at the top edge of the spring and filed a notch in the spring. Then,
        > I fired up the transmitter and "tested" it. For semi-automatic keying
        > at slow words-per-minute, that flat spring was still way too stiff.
        So,
        > I turned the bug over and used my file on what was then the bottom
        edge
        > of the spring, (being up-side-down, I could gently press down with
        each
        > file-stroke and the amount of vertical mass at that point of the
        spring
        > was now beginning to "look" narrow. Better test again. The
        performance
        > now was quite good for a speed of about 10 words-per-minute speed.
        Since
        > my goal was to bring it down to 5 words-per-minute, I continued to
        file
        > the bottom edge of that spring, and tested after each set of about six
        > strokes of the file.
        >
        > Sure enough, when I reached the place where the spring was "proper" to
        > rebulate the ditttssss evenly with the DAHs, the amount of steel left
        > was visible no more than about 1/8-inch. Fatigue might be a
        possibility,
        > but this adjustment in physical properties was inexpensive,
        interesting,
        > and successful in 1958, and it is still in good shape.
        >
        > Richard Meiss, WB9LPU, your bug is beautifull, ...and shines quite
        well.
        > The Government didn't attempt to protect their stuff. All it had to
        do
        > was work when plugged into a transmitter. Let me pose my opinion,
        with
        > no hands-on experience with your proposed corrective action using
        magnets.
        >
        > The "natural" feel of the corrective action with my bug has no
        quirkiness.
        > All of the physical properties "slowed" equally as I filed the steel
        > spring for less top-to-bottom mass. Just an idea worth consideration,
        > since I am now a reporting committee of one, uninvited to comment on
        the
        > subject. <grins>
        >
        > 73s
        >
        > Dick
        >
        > F. Richard Burt
        > W5QQM
        >
        > Garland, Texas
        >
        > BrazosValley@...
        >
        >
        > .
        > which I think could make placement and regulation of the
        counter-forces
        > necessary to compensate for too-rigid a return/restore spring
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
        > To: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 8:35 PM
        > Subject: [cw_bugs] New file uploaded to cw_bugs
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > This email message is a notification to let you know that
        > a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the cw_bugs
        > group.
        >
        > File : /BugNapper 6.pdf
        > Uploaded by : richard_meiss wb9lpu@...
        > Description : Another approach to slowing a bug
        >
        > You can access this file at the URL:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cw_bugs/files/BugNapper%206.pdf
        >
        > To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
        >
        http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
        > Regards,
        >
        > richard_meiss wb9lpu@...
        >
      • F. Richard Burt
        Good Morning, Rich, et al: By the time I get this letter into cyberspace, the sun, moon, and stars will convfirm that it is already Monday somewhere, so I can
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 23, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Good Morning, Rich, et al:
           
          By the time I get this letter into cyberspace, the sun, moon, and
          stars will convfirm that it is already Monday somewhere, so I can
          say "Good Morning" with a clear head. <grins>
           
          Your suggestions about how to relax the spring was a better idea
          than what I did with my file.  Good thinking.
           
          G'nite, ...or G'mornin'
          Dick
           
          .
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2011 7:51 PM
          Subject: [cw_bugs] Re: New file uploaded to cw_bugs

           

          Hi, Dick -

          I guess that it took a bit more nerve that I have to attack the
          mainspring of a bug, especially since it is riveted in place and your
          modification was pretty permanent. But if it worked for you, then it
          did its job. A potential problem with reducing the dimensions of the
          spring from the top and bottom is that it reduces the strength of the
          spring to bear the downward force of the weight on the pendulum. One
          way around this is to use a Dremel tool with a small abrasive wheel and
          remove a "slot" of material from the center of the spring. This
          preserves its width and reduces its lateral stiffness with little effect
          on the vertical strength. But it is still not reversible.

          I took some time to clean up the bug before taking the photographs,
          because it is my pride and joy. My father gave it to me in 1957 as a
          combination General license and birthday present. Actually, he brought
          home a Lafayette Radio bug (aka Skillman, "coffin bug", Hi-Mound, etc.).
          It was a nice bug in its own right, but my father saw in my face that I
          had really had my heart set on a Vibroplex, so he traded it in for one.
          It has stayed with me for many moves and escaped being cut down to make
          a CW paddle. To shine it up without damaging the chrome, I used a Mr.
          Clean Magic Eraser sponge. That item leaves no residue and has no
          abrasive effect either on the chrome or the crackle finish of the base.
          I would be careful about using it on one of the "Japanned" bases of the
          older Vibroplexes.

          A YouTube video of the BugNapper is in the works and should be
          finished before too long.

          73 de Rich, WB9LPU

          --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "F. Richard Burt" <BrazosValley@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Good Afternoon, Fellow Buggy Hams:
          >
          > My father and I liked to Rag Chew with other hams, even the Novice
          boys
          > who were still having trouble with 5 words per minute speeds. In a
          pick-up
          > equipment issue from Texas Army MARS, I obtained my very own Vibroplex
          bug
          > for my very own. The positioning spring was VERY stiff, and the
          ditttsss
          > ran way too fast, even with the weight as far out on the pendulum
          movement
          > as I could place it. So, handy man that I can be, sometimes, I
          thought
          > about it overnight, and work up from a dead sleep with the "solution."
          >
          > Fetching a fine-toothed metal file from my toolbox, I took careful aim
          > at the top edge of the spring and filed a notch in the spring. Then,
          > I fired up the transmitter and "tested" it. For semi-automatic keying
          > at slow words-per-minute, that flat spring was still way too stiff.
          So,
          > I turned the bug over and used my file on what was then the bottom
          edge
          > of the spring, (being up-side-down, I could gently press down with
          each
          > file-stroke and the amount of vertical mass at that point of the
          spring
          > was now beginning to "look" narrow. Better test again. The
          performance
          > now was quite good for a speed of about 10 words-per-minute speed.
          Since
          > my goal was to bring it down to 5 words-per-minute, I continued to
          file
          > the bottom edge of that spring, and tested after each set of about six
          > strokes of the file.
          >
          > Sure enough, when I reached the place where the spring was "proper" to
          > rebulate the ditttssss evenly with the DAHs, the amount of steel left
          > was visible no more than about 1/8-inch. Fatigue might be a
          possibility,
          > but this adjustment in physical properties was inexpensive,
          interesting,
          > and successful in 1958, and it is still in good shape.
          >
          > Richard Meiss, WB9LPU, your bug is beautifull, ...and shines quite
          well.
          > The Government didn't attempt to protect their stuff. All it had to
          do
          > was work when plugged into a transmitter. Let me pose my opinion,
          with
          > no hands-on experience with your proposed corrective action using
          magnets.
          >
          > The "natural" feel of the corrective action with my bug has no
          quirkiness.
          > All of the physical properties "slowed" equally as I filed the steel
          > spring for less top-to-bottom mass. Just an idea worth consideration,
          > since I am now a reporting committee of one, uninvited to comment on
          the
          > subject. <grins>
          >
          > 73s
          >
          > Dick
          >
          > F. Richard Burt
          > W5QQM
          >
          > Garland, Texas
          >
          > BrazosValley@...
          >
          >
          > .
          > which I think could make placement and regulation of the
          counter-forces
          > necessary to compensate for too-rigid a return/restore spring
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
          > To: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 8:35 PM
          > Subject: [cw_bugs] New file uploaded to cw_bugs
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hello,
          >
          > This email message is a notification to let you know that
          > a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the cw_bugs
          > group.
          >
          > File : /BugNapper 6.pdf
          > Uploaded by : richard_meiss wb9lpu@...
          > Description : Another approach to slowing a bug
          >
          > You can access this file at the URL:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cw_bugs/files/BugNapper%206.pdf
          >
          > To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
          >
          http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
          > Regards,
          >
          > richard_meiss wb9lpu@...
          >

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