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Re: [cw_bugs] Another way to slow a bug

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  • Earl Needham
    Looks interesting, wish I had time to really study it. 7 3 Earl KD5XB -- Earl Needham http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cw_bugs Quoting from the Coast Guard: ZUT
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 19, 2011
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      Looks interesting, wish I had time to really study it.

      7 3
      Earl

      KD5XB -- Earl Needham http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cw_bugs Quoting from the Coast Guard: ZUT Posted via Blackberry


      From: "richard_meiss" <wb9lpu@...>
      Sender: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2011 02:55:19 -0000
      To: <cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com>
      ReplyTo: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [cw_bugs] Another way to slow a bug

       

      Hi, All -

      As usual, I am a day late and a dollar short for the discussion on ways to slow a bug, but herewith is what has just come out of the workshop. In the "Files" section of the group I have uploaded a description of this new approach to slowing down a bug into a speed range that is more accessible to many hams that you meet on the air. There are also a couple of photos in the "Photos" section that are taken from the write-up. A YouTube movie of the device in operation is being prepared.

      I have called the device the BugNapper, because all of the better
      names, like BugTamer, were taken. Please let me know if this term has been used by someone else - my XYL has come up with a few names is this one is taken.

      73 de Rich, WB9LPU

    • k5est
      Hi Rich, very interesting BugNapper! Its nice but toooo much trouble for me to do all that stuff. Been using wooded clothes pins for 30 years to slow down a
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 20, 2011
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        Hi Rich, very interesting BugNapper! Its
        nice but toooo much trouble for me to do all
        that stuff. Been using wooded clothes pins for
        30 years to slow down a bug.....or just switch
        to a straight key.....grin!
        73....Walter - K5EST - Missouri


        --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "richard_meiss" <wb9lpu@...> wrote:
        >> I have called the device the BugNapper, because all of the
      • Richard Meiss
        Hi, Walter - Whatever works for you is best. This was something that has been running around in my mind for some time, and I just had to try it out. Yes, it is
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 20, 2011
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          Hi, Walter -

               Whatever works for you is best.  This was something that has been running around in my mind for some time, and I just had to try it out.  Yes, it is more complicated than the more direct methods, but it was fun to work out the physics.  Especially since I've been playing with magnets and springs most of my life.
               But your way is also quite effective - as a matter of fact, you can just use the dash paddle and skip the straight key altogether! 
               So, to each his own.  Hope to work you on the air someday.

               73 de Rich, WB9LPU





          -----Original Message-----
          From: k5est
          Sent: Jan 20, 2011 9:02 AM
          To: cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [cw_bugs] Re: Another way to slow a bug

           

          Hi Rich, very interesting BugNapper! Its
          nice but toooo much trouble for me to do all
          that stuff. Been using wooded clothes pins for
          30 years to slow down a bug.....or just switch
          to a straight key.....grin!
          73....Walter - K5EST - Missouri

          --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "richard_meiss" <wb9lpu@...> wrote:
          >> I have called the device the BugNapper, because all of the

        • wz4cw@comcast.net
               I ve examined the write up and photos of this device, and to me BugNapper seems to be pure genious.  It s obvious that it will slow the oscillation
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 21, 2011
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                 I've examined the write up and photos of this device, and to me BugNapper seems to be pure genious.  It's obvious that it will slow the oscillation of a bug.  The thing that makes it so inovative, is that it can be adjusted quickly and easily.   By simply turning a screw, the speed can be adjusted any amount, faster or slower.  Fantastic.

             

                 Now to speak more about "slowing" a bug.  Some people feel that to slow a bug "everything" must be slowed.  Instead of the bug operating at say 20-25 WPM, by adding weight, it is slowed to 10 WPM for example.  The effect of this is that while the overall speed is 10 WPM, the "character" speed is also 10 WPM.  This may not be the best way to "learn" and to "send" CW. 

             

                 Other people are of the opinion that while the overall speed needs to be slowed, the character speed should remain in the vicinity of 20 WPM.  To achieve an overall speed reduction, the "spaces" between characters and words are lengthened to give the overall speed desired.   If this method of "slowing" is followed, the effort to slow a bug is greatly diminished since it only needs to be slowed to 20 WPM.  Many people, as well as W1AW code practice, seem to subscribe to this approach. 

             

            Pick the method that works for you and Good Luck-    Carl   WZ4CW     

            73     SKCC 918     FISTS 13491

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "richard_meiss" <wb9lpu@...>
            To: "cw bugs" <cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 9:55:19 PM
            Subject: [cw_bugs] Another way to slow a bug

             

            Hi, All -

            As usual, I am a day late and a dollar short for the discussion on ways to slow a bug, but herewith is what has just come out of the workshop. In the "Files" section of the group I have uploaded a description of this new approach to slowing down a bug into a speed range that is more accessible to many hams that you meet on the air. There are also a couple of photos in the "Photos" section that are taken from the write-up. A YouTube movie of the device in operation is being prepared.

            I have called the device the BugNapper, because all of the better
            names, like BugTamer, were taken. Please let me know if this term has been used by someone else - my XYL has come up with a few names is this one is taken.

            73 de Rich, WB9LPU

          • G2JL
            To paraphrase Carl ( while the overall speed needs to be slowed, the character speed should remain in the vicinity of 20) by saying: IF overall speed needs
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 21, 2011
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              To paraphrase Carl ( while the overall speed needs to be slowed, the character speed should remain in the vicinity of 20)  by saying: " IF overall speed needs to be slowed, the character speed should remain in the vicinity of 20" sums it all up completely.   Below about 20 WPM,  Morse tends to become unreadable.  Only very skilled operators can concentrate well enough to read 12 wpm,  which is why The Test was such a challenge in the Bad Old Days !
               
              You can't learn to ride a pushbike by riding at 1 mile per hour.  Stage performers can do it,  yes;  but beginners need "steerage way".  Try to learn slow flying,  or low-launch-velocity astronautics ?  Try to learn a foreign language by starting at five syllables per minute ?  Nonsense !
               
              I've just got an antique McElroy,  because I want to re-learn buggery.  Do I slow it to 5 wpm ?  Do I buggery !
               
              Apologies if some of my linguistic subtleties are too obscure for some of our Overseas Members,  but you are all so good that I tend to forget.  Auf Deutsch,  ich bin schrecklich;  en francais,  dégeulasse.  As for my Greek,  the Greeks have a word for it !
               
              QAC de G2JL +
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