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Re: [cw_bugs] Re: Japanned Base Cracking

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  • Donald Kemp
    David, Chapter 2 of W. R. Smith s great book HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS is all about Japanning a key base. The ingredients are 2 parts of boiled linseed
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 11, 2010
      David,

      Chapter 2 of W. R. Smith's great book " HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS"
      is all about Japanning a key base.

      The ingredients are 2 parts of boiled linseed oil, 5 parts turpentine,
      3 parts asphaltum powder and 3 parts of rosin.

      How to do it is much too long for this posting, his book is the best
      source for the info. WR devotes 12 pages to japanning a base.

      --
      73,
      Don, NN8B
    • ve3akv
      Hello... I ve reading this thread with interest. The 1932-33 Lightning I have has this Leatherette or Crystal finish on it. I ll post a close up to the photo
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 11, 2010
        Hello...

        I've reading this thread with interest.

        The 1932-33 Lightning I have has this Leatherette or "Crystal" finish on it. I'll post a close up to the photo section.

        I've never seen or heard of an example of the "Japanned" base in a crinkle design. But then again, I'm fairly new with this stuff as I've only recently been "bitten by the bug"... ;)

        I have seen the finish you're showing on that bug in another medium...it is on 1962 Gibson B-25 guitar that I own. Before I received this instrument, it had been frozen and warmed too quickly a couple of times while on tour in the early 70's. More likely, many times. The previous owner had a bit of a "who cares" attitude towards his tools of the trade. The cracking on the guitar looks very much like what I call the "orange peel effect".

        Either way...from all I've managed to gleam across the internet and libraries...the "Japanned" finish seems to have come in two variations from the factory...gloss and semi-gloss type of finishes. But then again, we all know the internet is never wrong! :)

        73/72
        Bob
        VE3AKV


        --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, Donald Kemp <nn8b.oh@...> wrote:
        >
        > David,
        >
        > Chapter 2 of W. R. Smith's great book " HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS"
        > is all about Japanning a key base.
        >
        > The ingredients are 2 parts of boiled linseed oil, 5 parts turpentine,
        > 3 parts asphaltum powder and 3 parts of rosin.
        >
        > How to do it is much too long for this posting, his book is the best
        > source for the info. WR devotes 12 pages to japanning a base.
        >
        > --
        > 73,
        > Don, NN8B
        >
      • ve3akv
        Pics are now posted in the photo section under VE3AKV (second page). Bob
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 11, 2010
          Pics are now posted in the photo section under VE3AKV (second page).

          Bob



          --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "ve3akv" <ve3akv@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello...
          >
          > I've reading this thread with interest.
          >
          > The 1932-33 Lightning I have has this Leatherette or "Crystal" finish on it. I'll post a close up to the photo section.
          >
          > I've never seen or heard of an example of the "Japanned" base in a crinkle design. But then again, I'm fairly new with this stuff as I've only recently been "bitten by the bug"... ;)
          >
          > I have seen the finish you're showing on that bug in another medium...it is on 1962 Gibson B-25 guitar that I own. Before I received this instrument, it had been frozen and warmed too quickly a couple of times while on tour in the early 70's. More likely, many times. The previous owner had a bit of a "who cares" attitude towards his tools of the trade. The cracking on the guitar looks very much like what I call the "orange peel effect".
          >
          > Either way...from all I've managed to gleam across the internet and libraries...the "Japanned" finish seems to have come in two variations from the factory...gloss and semi-gloss type of finishes. But then again, we all know the internet is never wrong! :)
          >
          > 73/72
          > Bob
          > VE3AKV
          >
          >
          > --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, Donald Kemp <nn8b.oh@> wrote:
          > >
          > > David,
          > >
          > > Chapter 2 of W. R. Smith's great book " HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS"
          > > is all about Japanning a key base.
          > >
          > > The ingredients are 2 parts of boiled linseed oil, 5 parts turpentine,
          > > 3 parts asphaltum powder and 3 parts of rosin.
          > >
          > > How to do it is much too long for this posting, his book is the best
          > > source for the info. WR devotes 12 pages to japanning a base.
          > >
          > > --
          > > 73,
          > > Don, NN8B
          > >
          >
        • David Ring
          Hi Don, Yes, WR Smith s book is very excellent about japanning - but he doesn t mention what went into the sauce to make it look like leather - many times it
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 12, 2010
            Hi Don,

            Yes, WR Smith's book is very excellent about japanning - but he doesn't mention what went into the sauce to make it look like leather - many times it was a chemical process, sometimes a physical process such as dabbing more paint irregularly.

            73

            DR
          • Donald Kemp
            David, You re correct he does not say anything about that. I wonder if it would be Tung oil. That s the stuff for making the crackle finish. -- 73, Don, NN8B
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 12, 2010
              David,

              You're correct he does not say anything about that.
              I wonder if it would be Tung oil.
              That's the stuff for making the crackle finish.

              --
              73,
              Don, NN8B
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