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Bugs moving around

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  • James Wades
    Hi Bill: I think you hit the proper point when you say set it very light. A properly adjusted Vibroplex should not be moving all over the table, and if it
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 28 7:16 PM
      Hi Bill:

      I think you hit the proper point when you say "set it very light." A
      properly adjusted Vibroplex should not be moving all over the table,
      and if it does, it usually indicates excessive tension on the dit
      retractive spring and/or the dash tension spring. Spring tension
      should be just enough to provide crisp, snappy performance. On most
      properly adjusted bugs, the spring tension nuts will be backed out
      most or the way.

      There seems to be a host of ills associated with the adjustment and
      manipulation of speed keys out there, and the sound of some of them
      on-air reflects this. A carefully adjusted bug should be easy to
      operate and provide good readable code that is balanced and similar to
      the ratio provided by the newer electronic keyers. If one follows the
      instructions provided by Vibroplex or other documentation available on
      the Internet, it should eliminate any such problems.

      Here is a link to a pdf on bug adjustment available on the QMN/NREN
      net web site, which you can share with interested individuals:

      www.aa8vs.org/nren/docs/adjustbug.pdf

      I am sure there are also a few links out there to the old QST article
      that Vibroplex used to distribute explaining proper bug adjustment.

      As to you-tube videos...I'm afraid to look. Does the term "blind
      leading the blind" apply to videos? LOL.


      73, Jim Wades (K8SIW)



      > CW BUGS


      > Posted by: "Bill" w2blc@... w2blc
      >
      > Mon Jul 28, 2008 6:42 am (PDT)
      >
      > I have read many posts that make comments about Blue Racers tipping
      > over, rocking, moving all over the desk, etc. What gives with that?
      >
      > I recently bought a '62 model and really like it. I was able to set it
      > very light - as I have my VizBug - and it shows no signs of any
      > movement.
      >
      > My bugs are a little heavier to operate than my Vibroplex single lever
      > paddle - but not that much. I sure don't look like some of the "you-
      > Tube" examples slapping the bug around like it is an enemy.
      >
      > Am I missing something here?
      >
    • David Ring
      Bill, The Blue Racer feels like it is tippy. It really has never tipped over. Often the desktop was glossy and the bugs if they had old rubber feet which
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 28 8:57 PM
        Bill,

        The Blue Racer "feels" like it is tippy. It really has never tipped
        over. Often the desktop was glossy and the bugs if they had old
        rubber feet which had hardened had no ability to sit still.

        If the bug moved, the operator would feel the need to hold the bug.
        This the operator's didn't like because it hindered their ability to
        hold the telegram in the other hand, flip the pages to the second page
        of "fifty words" as telegrams were often done, tune the receiver. On
        a ship the Blue Racer was quite unpopular because of its size and when
        seas got rough the bugs were rendered useless because of rolling and
        pitching of the ship which would alternately make the key "light" and
        "heavy" and sometimes even produce a "key down" of a second or so as
        stomach, bug and ship moved in a sickening shudder as the prop
        cavatated.

        73

        DR
      • Bill
        I agree on the aging rubber feet problem. The best thing to do is to replace the feet. The second best is to stick on new bottoms to the feet. I have a sheet
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 29 6:55 AM
          I agree on the aging rubber feet problem. The best thing to do is to
          replace the feet. The second best is to "stick on" new bottoms to the
          feet.

          I have a sheet of 1/2 in diameter rubber jewelry box feet protectors
          that are about 1/32 inch thick. They work great for putting life back
          into the old hard as a rock feet that are original.

          Found them in a crafts store.
        • k4oso
          Bill, The third best thing (I ll respect your top two) is to place a bug-base- size piece of rubber shelf liner under the bug. Its foolproof, and veeerrrry
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 29 8:21 AM
            Bill,
            The third best thing (I'll respect your top two) is to place a bug-base-
            size piece of rubber shelf liner under the bug. Its foolproof, and
            veeerrrry inexpensive. If you take reasonable care cutting out your
            piece, it looks good too.
            73, Milt k4oso

            --- In cw_bugs@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <w2blc@...> wrote:
            >
            > I agree on the aging rubber feet problem. The best thing to do is to
            > replace the feet. The second best is to "stick on" new bottoms to the
            > feet.
            >
            > I have a sheet of 1/2 in diameter rubber jewelry box feet protectors
            > that are about 1/32 inch thick. They work great for putting life back
            > into the old hard as a rock feet that are original.
            >
            > Found them in a crafts store.
            >
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