Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Wilderness Survival Core Requirement

Expand Messages
  • Curtis Ware
    Rather than re-inventing the wheel, I thought I would ask the group: How are some of the methods that other crews use to teach Wilderness Survival. More
    Message 1 of 5 , May 31, 2009
      Rather than re-inventing the wheel, I thought I would ask the group: "How are some of the methods that other crews use to teach Wilderness Survival." More specifically the camping experience.

      Thanks in advance,

      Curtis

      http://www.crew370.com
    • Linda Weerts
      Curtis I am not sure I have any great answers for you.and I have been watching to see how other responded to you and since no one has yet-thought I would. This
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
        Curtis



        I am not sure I have any great answers for you.and I have been watching to
        see how other responded to you and since no one has yet-thought I would.



        This past November we did what we called our Wilderness Survival Campout. I
        can tell you it was pretty cold for my blood and survival was just keeping
        warm! LOL The kids had to gather wood for our fire as we did not have
        firewood available-for some this was the best part of the campout. It was
        really cold so they had to work hard to figure out how much and what kind of
        wood they would need for the two days. We had a demonstration of how to
        use kindling, tinder etc. They had to lean how to make the two different
        fire lays -one for warmth and one for cooking.



        This time the youth did not pick menus or anything instead they were told
        that the advisors would be doing this for them. WE did have them make a
        list at a meeting of things they thought they would need on a survival
        campout. (If something did not get on the list then they did not get to
        have it on the campout). One of the girls was pretty savvy and got into the
        details of the list..



        Once on the campout Josh (my associate advisor) started out by sharing a
        story of how they got stranded and here is all they have. you know one of
        those here is where you were headed and know you are on a island and only
        have this and what are you going to do..



        They were told they had to make their own shelters, find their food, etc.



        Some fun things we did were-we made shelters with tarps.it was pretty
        funny.after the kids struggled with the design for a while the associate
        advisor gave them some hints and they were able to redesign and then when
        they were finished everyone laid in the shelter to see if it was warm. To
        be honest I hated to get out ..back into the cold. We were suppose to sleep
        in them.but ended up not due to how cold it was. I personally think we
        might have been warmer in the shelter than in my tent.especially since one
        of the vents got left open! LOL They were pretty proud that they had
        finally figured it out!



        We also hid their food in the woods in a duffle bag and they had to find it.
        Next time we will make this harder.and maybe make them use their
        orienteering skills to find it ..



        The food was not what they are use to on campouts they got stuff like spam,
        crackers, cheese whiz, granola bars, mac and cheese, oatmeal (oh yeah the
        oatmeal was left at the grocery store) so they had fried spam for
        breakfast.not their favorite. They were allotted only so much fuel for
        backpacking stoves and only had two small pots to cook with. They had to
        figure out how to feed the group and only use so much fuel (there were only
        6 to feed). On the last morning the advisors surprised them with cooking
        them a great breakfast of breakfast burritos which they were starving for
        after the food limitations they had the day before.



        We did some hiking and a conservation project for the scout camp where we
        stayed.



        The kids had a lot of fun and indicated they would like to do something like
        this again in the future. Since we were camping on scout land we had port a
        potties. We talked about in the future going where they had to actually dig
        holes..our Crew would freak!



        At our meeting we had a demonstration of several different water
        purification methods . We also had some one come in and teach us the knots
        noted in the requirement. He was very patient and even my special needs
        student was successful in making the knots correctly. We would like to find
        some one to come and talk with us about emergency signals , search and
        rescue patterns and evacuation procedures as we have not finished the core
        requirement yet!



        So, any other ideas about wilderness survival would be great! We did have a
        group of youth take Wilderness First Aid which was lots of good information
        and lots of fun. Hope this gives you some ideas!



        YIV,



        Linda

        Advisor Crew 2085

        Olathe, KS



        From: crventuring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:crventuring@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Curtis Ware
        Sent: Sunday, May 31, 2009 11:55 AM
        To: crventuring@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Central Region Venturing: Wilderness Survival Core Requirement








        Rather than re-inventing the wheel, I thought I would ask the group: "How
        are some of the methods that other crews use to teach Wilderness Survival."
        More specifically the camping experience.

        Thanks in advance,

        Curtis

        http://www.crew370.com





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • OAherd@aol.com
        Our crew runs a 7- or 8- night training program. The first night deals with WS principles and priorities. The remaining nights each focus on one of the
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 2, 2009
          Our crew runs a 7- or 8- night training program. The first night deals with
          WS principles and priorities. The remaining nights each focus on one of
          the priority concerns. All but the first night are led by the venturers
          themselves. The venturers sign-up for topics the first night, research their
          topic, review the presentation/discussion they plan to lead with one of the
          adults who advise the WS program, then lead their session. The sessions often
          have hands-on elements.

          The module ends with a 3-day WS campout. The venturers are given a survival
          scenario: what happened, what gear/supplies survived the incident, etc.
          ... now survive.

          We've been able to hold the campout at scout camp and on private lands
          where meaningful shelters etc may be built. On two of the campouts, we invited
          an expert in edible outdoor plants to attend to give a lecture and outdoor
          presentation on that topic. So far no one has snared an animal. If they
          had, one of our adults with the correct experience would have handled the
          preparation as a demonstration. (I know of one crew that has gone to a rabbit
          farm with each pair of venturers skinning, preparing and cooking their own
          rabbit, but we haven't gotten to that stage.) Our first venturer to do the
          module, prepared a snail stew from a stream. It was sandy, but the advisor
          stepped up and ate a bowl with the venturer.

          On the campouts in the private land, we have included an afternoon service
          project for the landowner.

          The WS survival is one of the favorite outings for our venturers.
          **************We found the real ‘Hotel California’ and the ‘Seinfeld’
          diner. What will you find? Explore WhereItsAt.com.
          (http://www.whereitsat.com/#/music/all-spots/355/47.796964/-66.374
          711/2/Youve-Found-Where-Its-At?ncid=emlcntnew00000007)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • backcb@indianvalley.com
          To those of interest: I am Ed Gacek, part of the high adventure committee of our council and post chairman. We have several different training opps or
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 2, 2009
            To those of interest:

            I am Ed Gacek, part of the high adventure committee of
            our council and
            post chairman.

            We have several different training opps or workshops.
            Our council offers
            OPIK for the cold weather campers. I offer back country
            workshops that help
            in preparing for all types of outdoor experinces. It
            prepares groups for
            Philmont, Boundry Waters and other treks. The workshop focus
            is on sanitation,
            water purification, menu, LNT, clothing layering and
            equipment.

            Going for WFA is a big plus.
            It's always best to prepare for the worst and hope for
            the best.


            ----- Original Message Follows -----
            From: "Linda Weerts" <lindaweerts@...>
            To: "'Curtis Ware'" <cware@...>,
            <crventuring@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: RE: Central Region Venturing: Wilderness Survival
            Core Requirement
            Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 23:46:14 -0500

            > Curtis
            >
            >
            >
            > I am not sure I have any great answers for you.and I have
            > been watching to see how other responded to you and since
            > no one has yet-thought I would.
            >
            >
            >
            > This past November we did what we called our Wilderness
            > Survival Campout. I can tell you it was pretty cold for
            > my blood and survival was just keeping warm! LOL The kids
            > had to gather wood for our fire as we did not have
            > firewood available-for some this was the best part of the
            > campout. It was really cold so they had to work hard to
            > figure out how much and what kind of wood they would need
            > for the two days. We had a demonstration of how to use
            > kindling, tinder etc. They had to lean how to make the
            > two different fire lays -one for warmth and one for
            > cooking.
            >
            >
            >
            > This time the youth did not pick menus or anything instead
            > they were told that the advisors would be doing this for
            > them. WE did have them make a list at a meeting of things
            > they thought they would need on a survival campout. (If
            > something did not get on the list then they did not get to
            > have it on the campout). One of the girls was pretty
            > savvy and got into the details of the list..
            >
            >
            >
            > Once on the campout Josh (my associate advisor) started
            > out by sharing a story of how they got stranded and here
            > is all they have. you know one of those here is where you
            > were headed and know you are on a island and only have
            > this and what are you going to do..
            >
            >
            >
            > They were told they had to make their own shelters, find
            > their food, etc.
            >
            >
            >
            > Some fun things we did were-we made shelters with tarps.it
            > was pretty funny.after the kids struggled with the design
            > for a while the associate advisor gave them some hints and
            > they were able to redesign and then when they were
            > finished everyone laid in the shelter to see if it was
            > warm. To be honest I hated to get out ..back into the
            > cold. We were suppose to sleep in them.but ended up not
            > due to how cold it was. I personally think we might have
            > been warmer in the shelter than in my tent.especially
            > since one of the vents got left open! LOL They were
            > pretty proud that they had finally figured it out!
            >
            >
            >
            > We also hid their food in the woods in a duffle bag and
            > they had to find it. Next time we will make this
            > harder.and maybe make them use their orienteering skills
            > to find it ..
            >
            >
            >
            > The food was not what they are use to on campouts they got
            > stuff like spam, crackers, cheese whiz, granola bars, mac
            > and cheese, oatmeal (oh yeah the oatmeal was left at the
            > grocery store) so they had fried spam for breakfast.not
            > their favorite. They were allotted only so much fuel for
            > backpacking stoves and only had two small pots to cook
            > with. They had to figure out how to feed the group and
            > only use so much fuel (there were only 6 to feed). On the
            > last morning the advisors surprised them with cooking them
            > a great breakfast of breakfast burritos which they were
            > starving for after the food limitations they had the day
            > before.
            >
            >
            >
            > We did some hiking and a conservation project for the
            > scout camp where we stayed.
            >
            >
            >
            > The kids had a lot of fun and indicated they would like to
            > do something like this again in the future. Since we were
            > camping on scout land we had port a potties. We talked
            > about in the future going where they had to actually dig
            > holes..our Crew would freak!
            >
            >
            >
            > At our meeting we had a demonstration of several different
            > water purification methods . We also had some one come in
            > and teach us the knots noted in the requirement. He was
            > very patient and even my special needs student was
            > successful in making the knots correctly. We would like
            > to find some one to come and talk with us about emergency
            > signals , search and rescue patterns and evacuation
            > procedures as we have not finished the core requirement
            > yet!
            >
            >
            >
            > So, any other ideas about wilderness survival would be
            > great! We did have a group of youth take Wilderness First
            > Aid which was lots of good information and lots of fun.
            > Hope this gives you some ideas!
            >
            >
            >
            > YIV,
            >
            >
            >
            > Linda
            >
            > Advisor Crew 2085
            >
            > Olathe, KS
            >
            >
            >
            > From: crventuring@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:crventuring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Curtis
            > Ware Sent: Sunday, May 31, 2009 11:55 AM
            > To: crventuring@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Central Region Venturing: Wilderness Survival
            > Core Requirement
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Rather than re-inventing the wheel, I thought I would ask
            > the group: "How are some of the methods that other crews
            > use to teach Wilderness Survival." More specifically the
            > camping experience.
            >
            > Thanks in advance,
            >
            > Curtis
            >
            > http://www.crew370.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • OAherd@aol.com
            I don t know if this will come through to the list, but here is the picture of the shelter one of our venturers built to live in for 3 days. The others were
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 3, 2009
              I don't know if this will come through to the list, but here is the picture
              of the shelter one of our venturers built to live in for 3 days. The
              others were both similar and different; quite an assortment. By nightfall, most
              were layered inside with leaves, both for softer sleep and additional
              insulation from the cold. The temp dropped below freezing on one of the nights,
              but all were fine in their shelters -- sleeping bags were not one of the
              luxuries that survived the scenario mishap; they were "lost in the river"
              when the canoe overturned.

              I should mention that on every WS "practicum" campout, the venturers do
              have to prepare at least one meal entirely off the land. Hence the snail stew,
              some cooked fish, some berry meals, some insect delights, etc. I'm not
              sure the venturers have acquired a taste for a piping hot cup of pine-needle
              tea, but it has been a regular item in the cold.






              **************We found the real ‘Hotel California’ and the ‘Seinfeld’
              diner. What will you find? Explore WhereItsAt.com.
              (http://www.whereitsat.com/#/music/all-spots/355/47.796964/-66.374711/2/Youve-Found-Where-Its-At?ncid=eml
              cntnew00000007)


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.