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[XTalk] Re: Proto-Marcionite Paul?

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  • Steve Black
    ... A fairly straight forward suggestion might is that Paul was speaking figuratively when using the word beast . This is a typical Pauline use of rhetoric.
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 1, 2001
      >--- Mike wrote:
      >... needs to be explained by more conventional
      >theorists what this reference to fighting with lions is doing in
      >a genuine Pauline letter!)
      >

      A fairly straight forward suggestion might is that Paul was speaking
      figuratively when using the word "beast". This is a typical Pauline
      use of rhetoric. Acts of Paul might have misunderstood this as
      literal (not unlike ourselves???), and constructed a whole story
      around it.
      No way to prove any of this, but this seems very reasonable to me!
      --

      Steve Black
      Vancouver, BC

      Always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question
      ee cummings
    • mgrondin@tir.com
      ... Me too (and I apologize for using the word lion , which is not in the text), but now two possible avenues for supporting this: (1) if Paul had in mind
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 1, 2001
        --- Steve Black wrote:
        > A fairly straight forward suggestion (re: 1Cor15:32) ... is that
        > Paul was speaking figuratively when using the word "beast". This
        > is a typical Pauline use of rhetoric. Acts of Paul might have
        > misunderstood this as literal (not unlike ourselves???), and
        > constructed a whole story around it. No way to prove any of this,
        > but this seems very reasonable to me!

        Me too (and I apologize for using the word 'lion', which is not in
        the text), but now two possible avenues for supporting this: (1) if
        Paul had in mind some personal conflict in which he had been involved
        in Ephesus, it should be possible to point to a specific incident,
        or (2) if he had in mind that Ephesus was generally known for its
        arena "games" involving "beasts" (so that he was arguing via the
        counter-factual "If I were one of those who fight with beasts in
        Ephesus, what do I gain if there's no resurrection?"), again it
        ought to be possible to find something in the historical record.

        Regards,
        Mike
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