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Markan Invention of Judas and PN

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  • Ted Weeden
    Bob Schacht wrote on Saturday, July 28, 2001 12:31 PM in response to Bill Arnal s post of 7/28/01 ... Bill Arnal replied in a post, Sunday, July 29, 2001
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 29, 2001
      Bob Schacht wrote on Saturday, July 28, 2001 12:31 PM in response to Bill
      Arnal's post of 7/28/01

      > If Q had no PN, and Mark created it, what are the distinctive Markan
      > fingerprints to be found in his PN? Or maybe I should be directing this
      > question to Ted Weeden (but I'd appreciate your answer anyway!)

      Bill Arnal replied in a post, Sunday, July 29, 2001 11:20 AM

      > ... I HAPPEN to think that Mark DID fabricate his passion narrative, and
      > see his theological fingerprints in not only the presence but the
      > amplification in the Passion of such motifs as > irony, victory in
      > suffering, allusions to apocalyptic scenarios, the stupidity of the
      > disciples, the perfidy of the Jews, and so on.

      >> Or maybe I [Bob Schacht] should be directing this question to Ted Weeden
      >> (but I'd appreciate your answer anyway!)

      > Yeah, a more informed and detailed answer to Markan features in the
      > Passion would have to come from Ted Weeden.

      My response [TJW]:

      I have just returned from a bike trip in the Canadian Rockies to find a
      number of posts in response to my essay-post, "Taking the Markan Polemic
      Seriously," and my position that Mark invented Judas' betrayal and the
      Petrine denial, along with the passion narrative as we know it in the
      canonical gospels, and upon which the other canonical gospels are directly
      dependent in the formulating of their own respective passion narratives.
      The post exchange between Bill and Bob, as well as critiques of others, have
      led me to the decision to concentrate on the betrayal of Judas, setting
      aside the Petrine denial for now, and show in a far more complete and
      comprehensive way, than I have thus far, why I think the evidence is so
      convincing that Mark created Judas and his betrayal, and as well, at least
      for now, that part of the passion narrative in which Judas is involved

      In an essay-post that I hope will be completed by the end of the week, I
      will seek to demonstrate (1) evidence of clear Markan fingerprints (Markan
      intercalation) in incorporating Mark's own Judas material into the Markan
      Last Supper tradition, along with evidence of Matthean and Johannine
      verbatim appropriation of a significant part of that Markan intercalated
      material, (2) evidence that, aside from the bare-bones Markan material on
      Judas, there is no essential, multiple attestation among the other canonical
      authors for any of the other Judas material found in their respective
      gospels but not in Mark, (3) evidence that the additional information on
      Judas supplied by the other gospel writers (e.g. Judas' motive for betraying
      Jesus and the narratives of Judas' death) was motivated by the other
      canonical authors' interest in filling in the Markan narrative gaps and
      resolving Markan narrative ambiguities ( a la Meir Sternberg), (4) evidence
      that the other canonical authors lapsed into narrator "fatique" (a la Mark
      Goodacre) in trying to deal with Mark's creation of Judas, and (5) evidence
      that Paul, once again, shows no knowledge of the betrayal as underscored by
      the fact that his tradition's use of paradidomai in I Cor. 11:23, contra
      John Lupia (Thank you for your post, John), refers not to Judas handing
      Jesus over but rather God handing Jesus over, a la Isa. 53:6 (KURIOS
      PAREDWKEN AUTON TAIS hAMARTIAIS hHMWN) and the suffering servant motif
      that clearly lies behind the LS tradition Paul received, as well as the
      early creed of I Cor. 15:3-5.

      Ted Weeden
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