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Erratum Notice

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  • mgrondin@tir.com
    The hardcover edition of the English translation of Theissen and Metz s _The Historical Jesus_ contains the following paragraph on p. ... I sent an email to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2001
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      The hardcover edition of the English translation of Theissen and
      Metz's _The Historical Jesus_ contains the following paragraph on p.
      20:

      > Occasionally it is denied that the early Christian writings outside
      > the canon have any value for the reconstruction of the beginnings.
      > As more recent examples, we might mention the monographs written by
      > J.D. Crossan and R. Schnackenburg,2 which appeared in 1991 and 1993
      > respectively.

      I sent an email to Theissen inquiring about this apparent error. His
      response as follows:

      Dear Mr. Grondin,
      many thanks for Your Email. In the German original there we speak
      p. 38 of J.Gnilka and R. Schnackenburg. Why the translation shifted
      these names, I cannot say, but it is an embarrasing error, probably
      not the only one. Many thanks for Your hint to this error which in
      fact does not do justice to Crossan and his position.
      Sincerely
      Gerd Theissen

      I understand that the paperback edition has corrected this error.
      Those who might be using the uncorrected edition in their classes
      might want to note this erratum for their students.

      Mike
    • Mark Goodacre
      ... It s in the paperback version too, I m afraid. I remember puzzling over it. I haven t had the chance to follow this thread carefully, but wonder if I
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2001
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        On 2 Jul 2001, at 17:02, mgrondin@... wrote:

        > The hardcover edition of the English translation of Theissen and
        > Metz's _The Historical Jesus_ contains the following paragraph on p.
        > 20:
        >
        > > Occasionally it is denied that the early Christian writings outside
        > > the canon have any value for the reconstruction of the beginnings.
        > > As more recent examples, we might mention the monographs written by
        > > J.D. Crossan and R. Schnackenburg,2 which appeared in 1991 and 1993
        > > respectively.

        It's in the paperback version too, I'm afraid. I remember puzzling
        over it.

        I haven't had the chance to follow this thread carefully, but wonder if
        I might also draw attention to my article review of the book
        published in _RRT_ in 1999, which is also reproduced on the web:

        http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre/theissen.htm

        Mark
        -----------------------------
        Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
        Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512
        University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 6866
        Birmingham B15 2TT
        United Kingdom

        http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre
        Homepage
        http://NTGateway.com
        The New Testament Gateway
      • Ken Olson
        ... p. ... outside ... beginnings. ... by ... 1993 ... This may be a U.K./U.S. difference rather than a hardcover/paperback difference. My paperback edition
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2001
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          On July 2, Michael Grondin wrote:

          > > The hardcover edition of the English translation of Theissen and
          > > Metz's _The Historical Jesus_ contains the following paragraph on
          p.
          > > 20:
          > >
          > > > Occasionally it is denied that the early Christian writings
          outside
          > > > the canon have any value for the reconstruction of the
          beginnings.
          > > > As more recent examples, we might mention the monographs written
          by
          > > > J.D. Crossan and R. Schnackenburg,2 which appeared in 1991 and
          1993
          > > > respectively.

          And Mark Goodacre reponded:

          > It's in the paperback version too, I'm afraid. I remember puzzling
          > over it.

          This may be a U.K./U.S. difference rather than a hardcover/paperback
          difference. My paperback edition (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1998)
          has the correct references (i.e., Gnilka rather than Crossan).
          Strangely enough, it says "manufactured in Great Britain."

          Best Wishes,

          Ken

          Kenneth A. Olson
          Department of History
          2115 Francis Scott Key Hall
          University of Maryland
          College Park, MD 20742
          kaolson@...

          I am too much of a skeptic to deny the possibility of anything - T.H.
          Huxley
        • Bob Schacht
          Ever since one of my cousins heard that I am interested in historical Jesus research, he has been wanting my opinion about The Hiram Key: Pharaohs, Freemasons
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 29, 2001
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            Ever since one of my cousins heard that I am interested in historical Jesus
            research, he has been wanting my opinion about The Hiram Key: Pharaohs,
            Freemasons and the Discovery of the Secret Scrolls of Jesus, by Christopher
            Knight, Robert Lomas (1998). According to the Book Description on Amazon.com,
            The Hiram Key is a book that will shake the Christian
            world to its very roots. When Christopher
            Knight and Robert Lomas, both Masons, set out to find
            the origins of Freemasonry they had no idea
            that they would find themselves unraveling the true
            story of Jesus and the original Jerusalem Church.
            As a radically new picture of Jesus started to
            emerge, the authors came to the startling conclusion
            that the key rituals of modern Freemasonry were
            practiced by the early followers of Jesus as a
            means of initiation into their community.
            Another review claims that it is "backed by rigorous analyses of
            ancient Egyptian records, the Old and New Testaments,
            early Christian and Rabbinical texts, the
            Dead Sea Scrolls and the rituals of Freemasonry."
            So, I am not prepared to find the best scholarship in this book, which I do
            not yet have.
            If anyone has a copy, can you tell us what these so-called "secret scrolls"
            are supposed to be? Or is this book a work of fiction from cover to cover?
            Other reviews seem to suggest it is more about Freemasonry than historical
            Jesus scholarship.

            Sorry if this request is a bit more flakey than most, but friends of others
            might be asking about the book, too.

            Thanks,
            Bob
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