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Re: Mark 14:38 - interpretations

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  • RSBrenchley@aol.com
    ... Cranfield, in the Gospel According to St. Mark , CUP, 1959, p.434, suggests that TO MEN PNEUMA PROQUMON either: 1) echoes ps. 51:12, a willing spirit ,
    Message 1 of 3 , May 29 12:57 PM
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      Jeffrey writes:

      > Now, for a variety of reasons, my ability to do this on my own is
      > somewhat curtailed. So I wonder if I could call upon XTalk members to be
      > my "assistants" in this matter? That is to say, I'd be grateful if those
      > of you with commentaries on Mark 14:38 at hand would be kind enough to
      > send to me some indication of how the expression has been interpreted.
      > If you are so inclined, I ask that you quote as much of the discussion
      > as possible and give me full bibliographic details as well.

      Cranfield, in 'the Gospel According to St. Mark', CUP, 1959, p.434,
      suggests that TO MEN PNEUMA PROQUMON either:

      1) echoes ps. 51:12, 'a willing spirit', 'which seems to be identified
      with "thy holy spirit" in the previous verse. The meaning here would then be
      that God's Spirit which is imparted to them is willing, but their human
      nature is weak.

      or 2) 'it may be that PNEUMA is here used as in 2:8, 8:12, of the human
      spirit, and that Jesus praises their will to do right, "in order that their
      weakness may not throw them into despair" (Calvin). The suggestion that
      |Jesus is here speaking of himself is unlikely in view of the context vv 37,
      38a). Rawlinson is no doubt right in thinking that the early church would
      appreciate the value of this saying as a warning to those who had to face
      martyrdom not to forget the weakness of the flesh'.

      Hope this helps.

      Regards,

      Robert Brenchley

      RSBrenchley@...
    • Jacob Knee
      Thinking about expectation of the End in Matthew. How literally does the configuration of the story of the condemnation by the Queen of the South and the
      Message 2 of 3 , May 31 2:27 PM
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        Thinking about expectation of the End in Matthew.

        How literally does the configuration of the story of the condemnation by the
        Queen of the South and the people of Nineveh (12: 41-2) of 'this generation'
        correspond to Matthew's expectation?

        In particular is it legitimate to argue, that since the story might seem to
        presume a resurrection and a post mortem general judgement of 'this
        generation', that Matthew believes the End is not to be expected before
        'this generation' have actually died.

        (I've come across this claim in the recent work 'Jerusalem and Parousia'
        which I am working through with reference made to a 1986 article by Borg).

        Any comments?

        Best wishes,
        Jacob Knee
        (Cam, Gloucestershire)
      • brian j boland
        Jeffrey writes: I d be grateful if those ... Reply: Will not a more down to earth explanation suffice? Jesus had warned Peter in Mark 14.30,verse 38 then is
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 1, 2001
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          Jeffrey writes:
          I'd be grateful if those
          > of you with commentaries on Mark 14:38 at hand would be kind enough to
          > send to me some indication of how the expression has been interpreted.

          Reply:
          Will not a more down to earth explanation suffice? Jesus had warned Peter in
          Mark 14.30,verse 38 then is reminder to him. In view of Peter's actions in
          verse 71, could this have been the result of a hangover, giving a deeper
          sense to Peters warning in 1 Peter 5.8?

          Brian J Boland
          berean@...
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