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Re: [XTalk] definition of history

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  • Robert M. Schacht
    ... Then one must conclude that *all* hstorical knowledge is relative to the standards of the day, and that like Marcus Borg and others have argued, each
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 24, 2000
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      At 12:26 PM 12/23/00 , Bob Miller wrote:
      >Bob Schacht wrote:

      >>"First, Miller's definition of history bothers me because I feel nervous
      >>about cutting ourselves loose from "what happened in the past" as the
      >>ultimate standard of history. What I hear Miller clearly saying is that
      >>things that happened that we cannot "know" about are not a part of history.
      >>This seems a bit myopic to me. It seems to rule out, ex cathedra, some of
      >>the things about Jesus that his contemporaries felt were most important.
      >>We are close here to what I call the tyranny of the Normal."

      >Bob, there's no philosophical agenda here, just a definition that insists
      >that history is a form of human knowledge. So if something happened that
      >no one knows about anymore, then it cannot be part of our historical
      >knowledge. If in the future we discover evidence of that event, then it
      >will be part of our history. The Dead Sea Scrolls existed since whenever
      >they were written, but were not part of history until they were
      >discovered in this century. Things that Jesus did that nobody
      >remembered, and for which we have no evidence, are not part of our
      >intellectual construct called the "historical Jesus."

      Then one must conclude that *all* hstorical knowledge is relative to the
      standards of the day, and that like Marcus Borg and others have argued,
      each generation must re-write the book on the historical Jesus for itself?

      >I will be traveling for a few weeks and so drop out of this list for a
      >while. Thanks to all for the stimulating conversation.

      Thanks for your contributions to the conversation!


      >Merry Christmas,
      >Bob Miller


      Likewise!
      Bob Schacht
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