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Clement Clarke Moore

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  • Austin Meredith
    In the New York _Times_ yesterday, a New York reverend identified as a religious scholar, Clement Clarke Moore, of the 19th Century, was being accused of a
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 27, 2000
      In the New York _Times_ yesterday, a New York reverend identified as a
      religious scholar, Clement Clarke Moore, of the 19th Century, was being
      accused of a literary fraud. In regard to the famous anonymous poem "The
      Night Before Christmas," that had appeared in an upstate New York newspaper
      some twenty years before, the author of which had never been identified, he
      wrote to the owner of the newspaper and inquired whether they had any clues
      as to the identity of its author. Learning that everyone connected with
      that submission twenty years before was deceased, he inserted this famous
      poem into an anthology of his own poetry that he was editing, thus
      implicitly claiming authorship. Thus, we have always credited him with
      authorship.

      Now that this suspicious letter of inquiry has turned up, the _Times_
      reports, another suspicious claim of the Reverend Clement Clarke Moore has
      been also identified: in regard to a particular minor translation from the
      French, he identified himself as the translator when it seems clear that
      the translation had been done by another.

      The _Times_ spoke of Moore's standing as a religious scholar. So here's my
      question:

      Has anyone on this list heard of religious scholarship by a Clement Clarke
      Moore?
      Is this scholarship reputable?
      \s\ Austin Meredith <Kouroo@...> "Stack of the Artist of Kouroo" Project
    • Stephen Goranson
      That was indeed an interesting article, even if tenuously relevant to this list. The relevance may have less to do with Christmas than reminders that news
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 27, 2000
        That was indeed an interesting article, even if tenuously relevant to this
        list. The relevance may have less to do with Christmas than reminders that
        news about the past does arise. (Lately also the probably-authentic second
        photograph of Emily Dickenson; the pathetic note from the Russian
        submariner...). I'm not familiar with Moore's own writing, but his name
        appears on a Hebrew Lexicon and a critique of Thomas Jefferson's Notes on
        Virginia (which the title charges with "tending to subvert religion").

        Stephen Goranson
        goranson@...
        Durham NC
      • Sukie Curtis
        I believe that Clement Moore was an Episcopal priest/scholar who taught at General Theological Seminary (Episcopal) in NYC, which suggests he probably had a
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 27, 2000
          I believe that Clement Moore was an Episcopal priest/scholar who taught at
          General Theological Seminary (Episcopal) in NYC, which suggests he probably
          had a PhD.

          Sukie Curtis
          Cumberland Foreside, Maine

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Austin Meredith [mailto:Kouroo@...]
          > Sent: Friday, October 27, 2000 5:37 AM
          > To: crosstalk2@egroups.com
          > Subject: [XTalk] Clement Clarke Moore
          >
          >
          > In the New York _Times_ yesterday, a New York reverend identified as a
          > religious scholar, Clement Clarke Moore, of the 19th Century, was being
          > accused of a literary fraud. In regard to the famous anonymous poem "The
          > Night Before Christmas," that had appeared in an upstate New York
          > newspaper
          > some twenty years before, the author of which had never been
          > identified, he
          > wrote to the owner of the newspaper and inquired whether they had
          > any clues
          > as to the identity of its author. Learning that everyone connected with
          > that submission twenty years before was deceased, he inserted this famous
          > poem into an anthology of his own poetry that he was editing, thus
          > implicitly claiming authorship. Thus, we have always credited him with
          > authorship.
          >
          > Now that this suspicious letter of inquiry has turned up, the _Times_
          > reports, another suspicious claim of the Reverend Clement Clarke
          > Moore has
          > been also identified: in regard to a particular minor translation
          > from the
          > French, he identified himself as the translator when it seems clear that
          > the translation had been done by another.
          >
          > The _Times_ spoke of Moore's standing as a religious scholar. So
          > here's my
          > question:
          >
          > Has anyone on this list heard of religious scholarship by a
          > Clement Clarke
          > Moore?
          > Is this scholarship reputable?
          > \s\ Austin Meredith <Kouroo@...> "Stack of the Artist of
          > Kouroo" Project
          >
          >
          >
          > The XTalk Home Page is http://www.xtalk.org
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          > To subscribe to Xtalk, send an e-mail to: crosstalk2-subscribe@egroups.com
          >
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          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Wieland Willker
          from: http://www.library.utoronto.ca/utel/rp/authors/moorec.html Notes on Life and Works Moore s career was academic: born in New York, he took a B.A. from
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 30, 2000
            from:
            http://www.library.utoronto.ca/utel/rp/authors/moorec.html

            Notes on Life and Works
            Moore's career was academic: born in New York, he took a B.A. from Columbia University in
            1798 and from 1823 to 1850 was Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature at the General
            Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church, whose site he in fact donated for the
            college. His Compendious Lexicon of the Hebrew Language was published in 1809, but his
            fame came from a ballad that he wrote in 1822 for his two daughters, Margaret and Charity,
            and that was anonymously published a year later. Martin Gardner describes the great
            affection Moore earned for this poem as follows:

            Every year, in late December, a Clement Clarke Moore Christmas Commemoration is held in
            the Church of the Intercession at Broadway and 155th Street in uptown Manhattan. After the
            candlelight service, at which Moore's ballad is read, there is a lantern procession, with
            luck through snow, to Moore's grave across the street. (The Annotated Night Before
            Christmas, ed. Martin Gardner (New York: Summit Books, 1991; PS 2429 M5Z 54 1991 Robarts
            Library).
            Moore was buried in the Trinity Church cemetery at 155th Street and Amsterdam Ave. The
            1990 commemoration was the 79th.

            THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS
            (A VISIT FROM ST. NICHOLAS)
            by Clement Clarke Moore


            from:
            http://www.lnstar.com/mall/main-areas/Night_B_Xmas.html

            THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS
            (A VISIT FROM ST. NICHOLAS)
            by Clement Clarke Moore

            'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring,
            not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that ST.
            NICHOLAS soon would be there; The children were nestled all snug in their beds, While
            visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads; And mamma in her 'kerchief, and I in my cap,
            Had just settled down for a long winter's nap, When out on the lawn there arose such a
            clatter, I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. Away to the window I flew like
            a flash, Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.

            The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow Gave the luster of mid-day to objects below,
            When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny
            reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St.
            Nick. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and
            called them by name;

            "Now, DASHER! now, DANCER! now, PRANCER and VIXEN! On, COMET! on CUPID! on, DONNER and
            BLITZEN! To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall! Now dash away! dash away! dash
            away all!"

            As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly, When they meet with an obstacle, mount
            to the sky, So up to the house-top the coursers they flew, With the sleigh full of toys,
            and St. Nicholas too. And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof The prancing and
            pawing of each little hoof. As I drew in my hand, and was turning around, Down the chimney
            St. Nicholas came with a bound.

            He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished
            with ashes and soot; A bundle of toys he had flung on his back, And he looked like a
            peddler just opening his pack. His eyes -- how they twinkled! his dimples how merry! His
            cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry! His droll little mouth was drawn up like a
            bow, And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow; The stump of a pipe he held tight
            in his teeth, And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath; He had a broad face and a
            little round belly, That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly. He was chubby and
            plump, a right jolly old elf, And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself; A wink of
            his eye and a twist of his head, Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread; He spoke not
            a word, but went straight to his work, And filled all the stockings; then turned with a
            jerk, And laying his finger aside of his nose, And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose;
            He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle, And away they all flew like the down
            of a thistle. But I heard him exclaim, as he drove out of sight,

            " HAPPY CHRISTMAS TO ALL, AND TO ALL A GOOD-NIGHT!"


            Best wishes
            Wieland
            <><
            ---------------
            Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
            mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
            http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
          • Henry Carrigan
            Don t know of any particualrly scholarly work that Moore contributed, but he did donate the property that General Seminary now sits on. When he donated
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 30, 2000
              Don't know of any particualrly scholarly work that Moore contributed, but he did donate the property that General Seminary now sits on. When he donated it--General is at 21st Street and 9th Avenue--the property was riverfront property. Now, of course, the Seminary is several blocks west of the river because everyting between General and the river sits atop landfill.
              The outcome of the case will have a great effect on General as well since they advertise heavily that Moore, the author of the beloved poem "The Night Before Christmas," is responsible for General's existence. They'll need to make soem changes in their promo material.
              Henry Carrigan, Editorial Director Trinity Press International

              >>> "Sukie Curtis" <sbcurtis@...> 10/27 8:53 AM >>>
              I believe that Clement Moore was an Episcopal priest/scholar who taught at
              General Theological Seminary (Episcopal) in NYC, which suggests he probably
              had a PhD.

              Sukie Curtis
              Cumberland Foreside, Maine

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Austin Meredith [mailto:Kouroo@...]
              > Sent: Friday, October 27, 2000 5:37 AM
              > To: crosstalk2@egroups.com
              > Subject: [XTalk] Clement Clarke Moore
              >
              >
              > In the New York _Times_ yesterday, a New York reverend identified as a
              > religious scholar, Clement Clarke Moore, of the 19th Century, was being
              > accused of a literary fraud. In regard to the famous anonymous poem "The
              > Night Before Christmas," that had appeared in an upstate New York
              > newspaper
              > some twenty years before, the author of which had never been
              > identified, he
              > wrote to the owner of the newspaper and inquired whether they had
              > any clues
              > as to the identity of its author. Learning that everyone connected with
              > that submission twenty years before was deceased, he inserted this famous
              > poem into an anthology of his own poetry that he was editing, thus
              > implicitly claiming authorship. Thus, we have always credited him with
              > authorship.
              >
              > Now that this suspicious letter of inquiry has turned up, the _Times_
              > reports, another suspicious claim of the Reverend Clement Clarke
              > Moore has
              > been also identified: in regard to a particular minor translation
              > from the
              > French, he identified himself as the translator when it seems clear that
              > the translation had been done by another.
              >
              > The _Times_ spoke of Moore's standing as a religious scholar. So
              > here's my
              > question:
              >
              > Has anyone on this list heard of religious scholarship by a
              > Clement Clarke
              > Moore?
              > Is this scholarship reputable?
              > \s\ Austin Meredith <Kouroo@...> "Stack of the Artist of
              > Kouroo" Project
              >
              >
              >
              > The XTalk Home Page is http://www.xtalk.org
              >
              > To subscribe to Xtalk, send an e-mail to: crosstalk2-subscribe@egroups.com
              >
              > To unsubscribe, send an e-mail to: crosstalk2-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              > List managers may be contacted directly at: crosstalk2-owners@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >



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