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Re: [XTalk] Re: construction of messiahship: Parallels with Mohammed

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  • forrest curo
    ... Well, the faith involved is probably not what most people mean by faith. It has to do with enlightenment as the Hindus or Buddhists would put it;
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 13, 2000
      At 09:10 PM 9/12/00 -0700, you wrote:
      >At 08:57 PM 9/12/00 +0000, Karen Nooruddin wrote:
      >
      >>--- In crosstalk2@egroups.com, forrest curo <forest@c...> wrote:
      >> > >> One role that certainly needs to be kept in mind is
      >> > >the "prophet like
      >> > >> Moses." What evidence is there that this was how he thought of
      >> > >himself?
      >> > >> Well, no one of similar closeness to God seems to have come
      >>along.
      >
      >First off, I feel obliged to point out that this last sentence quoted
      >above, evidently written by Forrest, looks to me like a faith statement and
      >as such is not really appropriate material for this discussion group. It
      >would be more appropriate to follow the subject header (I have corrected
      >the misspelling of "contruction"), writing that "No one *construed* to be
      >of similar closeness to God seems to have come along" because then the
      >issue would have been how people *perceived* Jesus, which is a legitimate
      >subject of historical inquiry. The main point would then be how people at
      >the time of Jesus construed Messiahship (as the subject line suggests), and
      >how they evaluated whether a particular person would or would not "fit"
      >that construction.

      Well, the "faith" involved is probably not what most people mean by
      "faith." It has to do with "enlightenment" as the Hindus or Buddhists would
      put it; there are hints in the writings about both Moses and Jesus that
      they "understood" God in this way.
      I agree that the more easily settled question is "What did people expect?"
      The Messiah was expected to liberate Israel from the pagans as Moses
      liberated them from Egypt. Some were prepared to see this as a straight
      matter of military strenth-plus-divine-intervention, ie Bar Kocheba. But a
      "prophet like Moses" would have been a reasonable agent for deliverance,
      given the escape-from-Egypt tradition. Josephus mentions incidents in which
      mistaken 'prophets' led large groups of people to 'part the Jordan' or
      'find the holy relicts', developments which the Romans responded to by
      massacring the lot.

      Forrest
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