Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

An apocalyptic Jesus

Expand Messages
  • Brian McCarthy
    Sukie and everybody I see two main problems with an apocalyptic Jesus. i) Illusion. It is one thing to want and hope for a world soon to be freed from cruelty,
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Sukie and everybody
       
      I see two main problems with an apocalyptic Jesus.
       
      i) Illusion. It is one thing to want and hope for a world soon to be freed from cruelty, oppression, poverty etc., it is another to be convinced--with much apocalyptic thinking--that you know that God is about the usher in such a world.
       
      To share such an illusion is the be seriously discredited. And it raises the q. of what rolw this illusion plays in a persons i) public mission ii) teaching. If they are essentially dependent on this illusion then are they not worthless?
       
      ii) the Apocalyptic made classical due to the influence of the Bk of Revelation-- which is not merely a canonical Christian writing, but the one which recounts the triumphant conclusion of the great narrative which begins in Genesis--concerns not just the neutralization of the wicked, the 'forces of evil', but also  human vengeance, monstrous divine wrath, cruelty and the killing of the innocent (e.g. the children of the wicked, at least it is never said that they will be spared).
       
      See, for example, Rev. 9:5, which talks of people longing for death because their pain from scorpion stings is so great, but being kept alive for months!
       
      Or 14:10 which speaks of those who "in fire and brimstone...will be tortured in the presence of the holy angels and the Lamb, and the smoke of their torture will rise for ever and ever." Compare 21:8.
       
      Even if written in response to the savageries of the Neronian or some similar  persecution this book is pathological. But it is also echoing the biblical theme of a pathologically wrathful and punitive God. (Fortunately there are other biblical themes concerning God, starting with Gen. 1.)
       
      Finally, compare Mt 25:41 to Rev. 14:10 and 21:8. Mt. has Jesus sending not serial killers, oppressors etc., but those guilty of 'sins of omission' to "the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels".
       
      Do the scholars who find an 'apocalyptic' Jesus--most recently, Ehrman and Allison--find one who i) did not suffer from illusion or ii) was not pathologically cruel and punitive?
       
      Brian McCarthy, Madison WI
       
       
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.