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Chinnereth = Gennesaret = Genezar = Nazaret = Nazareth ? (All Gal ilee)!

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  • Brooks, George X
    I have looked through the old Crosstalk s postings on Nazareth and the research on the alleged existence of that town at the time of Jesus. I write this
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 30, 2000
      I have looked through the old Crosstalk's postings on Nazareth and
      the research on the alleged existence of that town at the time of Jesus.
      I write this sentence in hopes that we don't have to revisit every detail
      that has already been written. It was a long and tortured discussion.

      But....

      Perhaps I missed something. Nowhere did I find a discussion of
      how possible or impossible that Jesus "of" "Nazar---", or his
      "Nazar----enes" might have to do with the Greek name for the
      Hebrew word, Chinnereth.

      Below is a fascinating definition from the Easton Bible Dictionary:


      Easton's Bible Dictionary
      Gennesaret: a garden of riches. (1.) A town of
      Naphtali, called
      Chinnereth (Josh. 19:35), sometimes in the plural form
      Chinneroth
      (11:2). In later times the name was gradually changed
      to Genezar and
      Gennesaret (Luke 5:1). This city stood on the western
      shore of the lake
      to which it gave its name. No trace of it remains. The
      plain of
      Gennesaret has been called, from its fertility and
      beauty, "the Paradise
      of Galilee." It is now called el-Ghuweir.
      (2.) The Lake of Gennesaret, the Grecized form of
      CHINNERETH
      (q.v.). (See GALILEE, SEA OF ¯T0001418.)


      This, in connection with the a pre-Jesus Jewish sect called the "nazarenes"
      (spelling uncertain, depending upon the ancient writer), would make it at
      least feasible that what we now call Nazareth is NOT the Nazareth of
      Jesus's home town. And that a shoreline community like the above
      referenced "Gennesaret", perhaps THE "paradise" of Jesus' adult days,
      would fit the bill in many ways.

      While those who believe in the inerrancy of the Bible would certainly have
      some reasons to refute this possibility. But I would be interested in
      hearing
      from more "dry eyed" academics why we should (or shouldn't) ignore this
      possibility.

      George Brooks
      Tampa, FL
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