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RE: [XTalk] Gospel of God

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  • Joseph Codsi
    Bruce, I am trying to understand what you said in your last posting about the two secrets in Mark.
    Message 1 of 42 , Jan 1, 2011
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      Bruce,

      I am trying to understand what you said in your last posting about the
      two secrets in Mark.

      <<<The first secret in Mark is the Davidic mission of Jesus; it had to
      be kept
      secret from the public because the Romans were watching. Very plausible.
      The
      second secret in Mark is the divine nature and soteriological centrality
      of
      Jesus, and this secret is kept from people previously privy to the
      Davidic
      secret, namely everybody: Jesus's crowds and his intimate circle.>>>

      The two secrets are known to us because they are revealed in the Markan
      narrative. I have no problem with the second secret. There are many
      epiphanies that reveal the secret identity of Jesus. Besides, the Markan
      Jesus is described as taking part in the revelation of this theology.
      This is particularly clear in the predictions of the Passion and in what
      pertains to the need for the disciples to follow in the steps of Jesus.
      But this revelation was not made during the life of Jesus. It
      corresponds to a specific stage (Pauline and post Pauline) in the
      elaboration of Christology years after the death of Jesus.

      I have a problem with the first secret, namely with its revelation. The
      first time a connection is made between Jesus and David is in 10:47 and
      48, where the blind man, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, calls him 'son of
      David.' The second one is in 11:10 (triumphal entrance to Jerusalem).
      There is a problem with the historicity of what is revealed in those two
      instances. Chances are these revelations are based on some post-Easter
      theology.

      In the Passion narrative, Jesus is called "the king of the Jews." Pilate
      and the soldiers use this expression in 15:2, 9, 12 and 18. Add to this
      the inscription on the cross (15:26) and the sarcastic remark: "Let the
      Messiah, the King of Israel, come down from the cross now" (15:32). If
      this language is to be considered historical, how did the enemies of
      Jesus acquire this knowledge? If it is not, what could have been the
      real reason why Jesus was crucified?

      The problem with the Markan narrative is that it transforms the
      historical events in two ways: by addition and by omission. The real
      secret is perhaps in what it omits to say and remains unknown.

      Joseph

      Seattle


      ________________________________

      From: crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of E Bruce Brooks
      Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2010 9:37 PM
      To: crosstalk2@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [XTalk] Gospel of God
    • Ronald Price
      ... Joseph, Jesus¹ symbolic enactment of the prophecy of Zech 9:9 attracted crowds (Mk 11:8-10). This would have come to the notice of the Roman authorities,
      Message 42 of 42 , Jan 17, 2011
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        Joseph Codsi wrote:

        > In the Passion narrative, Jesus is called "the king of the Jews." Pilate
        > and the soldiers use this expression in 15:2, 9, 12 and 18. Add to this
        > the inscription on the cross (15:26) and the sarcastic remark: "Let the
        > Messiah, the King of Israel, come down from the cross now" (15:32). If
        > this language is to be considered historical, how did the enemies of
        > Jesus acquire this knowledge?

        Joseph,

        Jesus¹ symbolic enactment of the prophecy of Zech 9:9 attracted crowds (Mk
        11:8-10). This would have come to the notice of the Roman authorities, who
        would have enquired what the commotion was all about. Finding that the
        person on the donkey was said to be a king (³Lo, your king comes to you
        ...²), and taking note of the crowds he had attracted, would probably have
        been quite enough in the eyes of the authorities to have Jesus arrested as a
        threat to Roman rule.

        Ron Price,

        Derbyshire, UK

        http://homepage.virgin.net/ron.price/

        >



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