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Re: [XTalk] COSMOLOGY AND APOCALYPTIC - A MEDITATION

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  • jgibson000@comcast.net
    ... Sorry, but to my mind the claim above shows a woeful unfamiliarity with recent discussion of the ground of the ethics of Jesus as well as with the Gospel
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 20, 2010
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      On 7/19/2010 5:57 AM, Dennis Goffin wrote:
      >
      > When one views Jesus through this lens it is much easier, in my view, to place him in context and to see his eschatological mission and resulting interim ethic in the context of the age-old conundrum of the Jews, set out in the Book of Job, where they try to reconcile a just God with the suffering of the righteous and are forced to view the solution of the problem in the return of Eden or a future Paradise.
      Sorry, but to my mind the claim above shows a woeful unfamiliarity with
      recent discussion of the ground of the ethics of Jesus as well as with
      the Gospel accounts of Jesus ethical teaching.

      So far as I know, very few NT scholars believe that Jesus propounded an
      "interim ethic", let alone that the ethical teaching is a result of any
      belief on Jesus' part that the world was going to end soon.

      You would do well to have a look at Lincoln Hurt's article on "The
      Ethics of Jesus" in : /Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels/. Downers
      Grove, Ill. (Green, Joel B. ; McKnight, Scot ; Marshall, I. Howard,
      eds.) : InterVarsity Press, 1992,

      Pertinent to your assumption are these remarks:

      But lack of exegetical accuracy was not the only difficulty with
      Schweitzer’s theory. Another was its failure to accommodate ethical
      teaching to the question of eschatology. Having insisted with J.
      Weiss that eschatology was the indispensable framework for the
      interpretation of NT teaching, he was then faced with the ethical
      teaching of the Gospels, which he declared to be an “interim
      ethic” (/Interimsethik)/—an ethic of impractical idealism which
      could never have been designed for a long period. It was possible
      for Jesus to talk in this way only because he believed that the
      interval between his preaching and the end of the world was so short
      that he could afford to be impractical. That view of the ethics of
      Jesus was soon met not only with blanket incredulity but substantial
      arguments to the contrary. In the ethical teaching of Jesus (as in
      the ethics of the whole NT), the sanctions for the teaching are only
      in very rare cases the expectation of a future crisis. The reasons
      are nearly always based on what God has done, on the character of
      God himself, on the character of Jesus or on the nature of the
      Christian revelation. They are certainly /not/ based on any final crisis


      Jeffrey

      --
      Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
      1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
      Chicago, Illinois
      e-mail jgibson000@...
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